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Book Review: Boss Bitch by Nicole Lapin

Boss Bitch

(Crown, 2017)

By Alethea Spiridon

 

Nicole Lapin knows what she’s talking about. She’s a wildly successful career woman who has blazed a path for herself as both a businesswoman (launching the CASH Smartwatch) and as a news anchor for CNN and CNBC. A boss bitch is the “she-ro” of her own story, Lapin writes on page 1 of the book: “She is the heroine who doesn’t need saving because she has her own shit handled. I became a Boss Bitch by embracing being a ‘boss’ in all aspects of the word.”

 

That opening sets the tone and pace for this marvellous book that will no doubt empower women who need a nudge, or even an all-out kick in the butt, to take their career—and life—to the next level, and to be as successful as wanted and needed. Lapin’s tone is forthright and honest, and girlfriend to girlfriend, something she says at the outset is exactly how she intends it to be.

 

Her voice and approach make the content relatable and easy to digest; it’s like going for drinks with a great friend who has your back, but calls you out on your nonsense because all she wants is the best for you. Lapin has plenty of insights to share that can really help women get back on track or consider what track to finally take to become the Boss Bitch in their own lives.

 

Though the book promises a “12-Step Plan to Take Charge of Your Career” it really isn’t a 12-step approach because not all steps will apply to all women. The steps are divided into three sections: Being the Boss of You, Being the Boss at Work, and Being the Boss of Your Own Business. This is the book’s only failing. Although many women will fall into one of these categories, it seemed as though there would be a 12-step outline you should follow to become a Boss Bitch. But no. This is a little misleading, but not enough to condemn the book as a whole. Boss Bitch contains hidden gems of advice given throughout and offers much valuable insight and advice for every woman at whatever stage of her career she is in.

 

One of the book’s best aspects is what Lapin calls the “Bottom Line”, offered at the end of each chapter, tackling a piece of conventional wisdom, then giving it her spin on the “Real Deal.” The real deal is her no sugar-coating take on the situation presented, and she shows how the conventional wisdom of the topic at hand may or may not be accurate. For example, one piece of conventional wisdom is that assertive women are overbearing. Her first response to this, her Real Deal reply? “Hell no.” These insights alone, as well as the Bitch Tips and Confessions of a Boss Bitch sprinkled throughout each chapter, are worth the price of the book alone.

 

She holds nothing back, from revealing her salary level along the course of her career, to personal anecdotes of failure, to how she got back up and learned from those experiences. Her strength of character and steadfastness in her desire to succeed is utterly infectious and is sure to inspire the women who take the time to invest in themselves by reading her book. Boss Bitch is a manifesto of sorts on how to achieve your best self and best life without compromising your values, ethics, and true desires.

Alethea Spiridon is a writer and editor in Southern Ontario. Her first book, Kissing Strangers: How to Online Date Like a Boss is out now and available on Amazon. [www.freelanceeditor.ca]

This article was copy edited by Nicole North.

Book Review: What Next? by Dr. Barbara Moses

What Next?

by Karen Kemlo

Dr. Barbara Moses, known as “Canada’s career guru,” is a leading expert in work satisfaction and career success. This updated third edition of her best-selling book What Next? has something for anyone who is at a crossroads in their career or work life.

From millennials starting out in their job searches to more mature workers changing careers, this is a great step-by-step guide to making the next move. But be warned—it’s a big read with lots of homework in the form of self-assessment questions. Although likely meant to instill greater self-reflection, the detailed questions often bring the book and the reader to a full stop.

The early chapters discuss the notion of identifying one’s “core motivators” for seeking certain types of work. Based on her research, Moses has identified eight motivational types: sociability seekers, career builders, authenticity seekers, personal developers, novelty seekers, entrepreneurs, lifestylers, and stability seekers. The challenge, according to Moses, is “to find a work environment that provides the best possible match.”

It’s a unique approach to career guidance, something I wish I’d known about when starting out in the work world. Perhaps it would’ve focused my early job and education goals sooner. It might have also saved me the horror of dead-end and minimum-wage jobs. But I also know that my 20-year-old self would never have taken the time to fill out all of the questionnaires in this book.

Given the current job market, and the rise of part-time and precarious work, it seems unrealistic to assume that all workers will always have the ability to choose. Sometimes you have to take jobs and work with difficult people, simply in order to pay the bills. Life challenges, such as downsizing, divorce or illness get in the way of career goals.

What Next? is still a great resource for people at different stages in their careers and touches on some of the issues that everyone has to deal with at some point: how to overcome job burnout, how to deal with difficult bosses, what to do if you’re fired, how to write a resumé, and the benefits of networking. These chapters are shorter and less detailed than the ones on self-assessment and motivational types. As a consequence, the author—and the reader—spend more time inside the world of ideas and ideal jobs than in the real world of work.

Karen Kemlo is a freelance editor and writer in Toronto. 

This article was copy edited by Ellen Fleischer

Seminars: Getting government work

Some of the highest-paid, most challenging and satisfying editing work is for government. But landing the projects can be as challenging and time-consuming as doing the work. This seminar covers the various ways in which governments at various levels farm out freelance and contract work. We will look at the complexities of getting on suppliers’ lists (and staying on them) and becoming a Vendor of Record, as well as how to get standing-order contracts and how to get work from them. The seminar will also cover the entire process of finding and responding to RFPs, RFQs, RFIs, and other government procurement documents. Finally, you’ll learn when to submit a proposal and how to do so effectively (more…)

Editors Canada call for submissions

Contract
Making contact with a potential client is good, getting a potential client to sign a contract is better. Do you have a method you use in order to ensure that the potential client you make contact with becomes a client you contract with?

Editors Canada wants to hear about the tips and tricks you use to close the deal with a potential client. The submissions we receive will be included in the first in a series of editing-related chapbooks from Editors Canada, this one entitled From First Contact to Signed Contract.

We’re looking for submissions of 500–700 words by March 1, 2017. So, submit your tips to Michael Bedford and encourage your colleagues to submit as well so that you can become an important part of this milestone publication from Editors Canada.

Next-level networking for freelancers

Diversity Editors Networking

Photo copyright Rawpixel


by Michelle Waitzman

As a freelance editor, you know that networking is an important part of marketing. But the prospect of networking is unappealing to many editors. Freelance editors generally tend to be introverts who are uncomfortable when surrounded by strangers and forced to make small talk. It can be downright nerve-racking! Joining Editors Canada is a good first step toward successful self-promotion, and you may have also explored writers’ groups in hopes of finding clients. But networking with writers and editors will only take you so far. Contrary to popular belief, however, extra networking doesn’t have to mean extra work.

Clients can come from unexpected places, and the more diverse your network becomes the more opportunities you will have to meet people who can expand your client list. A diverse network doesn’t mean a random one; by finding people you share common interests, skills, or philosophies with, you will increase your chances of working with compatible clients. Follow your passions and interests, and you may just find clients where you least expect them. Here are a few suggestions to get you started. (more…)