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Editors Unplugged: Get to know our panellists for Professional Editorial Standards in Action (Part II)

Interviews conducted by Catherine Dorton.

Our popular monthly program meetings often feature a jam-packed agenda. We like to keep our introductions short, so you can hear more from our panellists and less from us! It’s hard to do justice to the incredible wealth of experience these guests bring to the table, so we are offering you a preview with this short Q&A beforehand.

 

Jennifer DinsmoreJennifer Dinsmore

What were your goals when you started your career and have you reached them?

When I first started this career and got my Creative Book Publishing certificate from Humber College, I definitely saw myself as an in-house editor. But the job market didn’t make that easy. I went on to complete an internship and bounced around a bit in related roles, the longest as a publicist/proofreader for a small academic publisher. I still wanted to focus on editing, so I started a freelance editorial business three years ago. Now, my goal is to help independent and self-publishing authors prepare their books for market or to query [literary] agents. When a client tells me how much I’ve helped them, I know I’ve been successful, but it’s something I strive toward all the time.

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Editors Unplugged: Get to know our panellists for Professional Editorial Standards in Action (Part I)

Interviews conducted by Catherine Dorton.

Our popular monthly program meetings often feature a jam-packed agenda. We like to keep our introductions short, so you can hear more from our panellists and less from us! It’s hard to do justice to the incredible wealth of experience these guests bring to the table, so we are offering you a preview with this short Q&A beforehand.

 

Amy BrownAmy Brown

What were your goals when you started your career and have you reached them?

I was looking for a career that I could develop on my own time, do from home, and be intellectually engaging. Editing absolutely fit the bill on all three counts! As I’ve matured as an editor, I have learned so much about communication, respect, and empathy.

If you could pick a new profession, what would you be and why?

Funny you should ask. As of this month, I am training to become a personal and business development coach. I wanted to keep the freedom and challenge of freelance editing and add more human contact; I’m perhaps too much of an extrovert to be a full-time editor!

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Editor for Life: Freelance editor Catherine Dorton

Interview conducted by Jennifer D. FosterCatherine Dorton

A career as an editor is often a solo adventure, especially if you’re a freelancer. So we thought one way to better connect with fellow editors was to ask them the W5: who, what, where, when, and why. Read on for some thought-provoking, enlightening tidbits from those of us who choose to work with words to earn our keep.

Catherine, please tell us a little about yourself, the kind of work you do, and how long you’ve been an editor.

I’ve been working as a freelance editor for 10 years after working in-house as a production editor at Penguin. I love the freedom and flexibility of freelancing and the amazing variety of projects I do. I work on trade books—all kinds—but with a special passion for children’s books. When I’m not editing, I’m often out hauling water to thirsty trees, biking, or sitting on my porch enjoying a coffee and a book.

Who: If you could edit one famous author, living or dead, who would it be?

Being an editor may be solitary, but I don’t welcome communing with ghosts! However, if I were to be haunted by a dead author (with manuscript in hand), I’d pick a Brontë, preferably Charlotte. I think we are kindred spirits.

Closer to home and the present, I’ve been a huge admirer of Deborah Ellis ever since my son and I “tandem” read The Breadwinner series last summer. She is an activist, and her books are a great catalyst for change among kids who can see themselves in the “ordinariness” of her characters as they prevail in the most difficult circumstances. From war-torn Afghanistan to the coca fields of Bolivia and beyond, she tackles big issues––drug trafficking, homelessness, child labour, leprosy, HIV––but somehow leaves the reader feeling renewed and hopeful. Kids are capable of so much empathy, and she really taps into that gift. It would be a pleasure and an honour to work on one of her books. (more…)