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The Nitpicker’s Nook: March’s linguistic links roundup

The Nitpicker’s Nook is a monthly collection of language-related articles, interviews, and blog posts from around the Web. If you read something that would make a good addition, email your suggestion to [email protected].

The Nitpicker's NookBy Robin Marwick

  • When it seems like everyone you know is going to exciting conferences in exotic places, it’s easy to develop FOMO—Fear Of Missing Out. Luckily, says Dawn McIlvain Stahl, social media can help soothe your pangs of envy. (Copyediting.com)
  • Like many freelancers, it took illustrator and author Lisa Congdon a long time to feel comfortable turning down work. In this post, she discusses the importance of saying no in order to protect your time and creativity. (Today Is Going To Be Awesome)
  • All too often, a promising client-freelancer relationship founders because the two parties have assumptions and expectations that don’t match. Ruth E. Thaler-Carter has a list of questions to help clarify that relationship from the outset. (An American Editor)

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The Nitpicker’s Nook: February’s linguistic links roundup

The Nitpicker’s Nook is a monthly collection of language-related articles, interviews, and blog posts from around the Web. If you read something that would make a good addition, email your suggestion to [email protected].

The Nitpicker's NookBy Robin Marwick

  • Mary Norris has worked at The New Yorker since 1977 as an indexer, collator, and finally, a copy editor. This lovely article is both a short memoir and an ode to the comma. (The New Yorker)
  • “Many tears have been shed trying to save a sentence that should just be put out of its misery.” Historical romance novelist Joanna Bourne gives a master class in waking up a dull sentence. (Joanna Bourne)
  • So the novel you’re about to copy edit has 73 characters, 12 locations, and follows a fiendishly complex interlocking timeline. Where to start? With a style sheet, of course. Amy J. Schneider explains how she approaches character style sheets. (An American Editor)
  • If you edit projects with their own special vocabulary, a custom dictionary can be a lifesaver. Andy Hollandbeck explains how to create and use custom dictionaries with Microsoft Word. (Copyediting.com)

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