BoldFace

Home » Posts tagged 'Laura Godfrey'

Tag Archives: Laura Godfrey

By the Book: Copy editor and writer Laura Godfrey’s book highlights

Interview conducted by Jennifer D. FosterLaura Godfrey

Have you ever wondered what fellow editors like to read? We have, too. In our interview series “By the Book,” we get the inside scoop on editors’ all-time favourite books, their top style guides, and what their alternate-universe careers would be.

Tell us about your current job, Laura, plus a little-known quirky fact about you.

Well, I currently have two jobs. My full-time job is as a newspaper copy editor and page designer at Pagemasters North America (owned by The Canadian Press) where I work on the Toronto Star desk drawing pages, editing for print and online, and writing headlines and other display copy. I work at this job five evenings a week—newspaper editors work odd hours preparing the paper for the printer—which actually works out well, because it gives me time to do freelance work during the day.

My freelance job is as the Canadian correspondent for Publishers Weekly, the New York–based magazine about the book publishing industry. I get to write about everything from literary awards to Indigo’s quarterly reports to new Canadian children’s books—I’m excited about Hark! A Vagrant creator Kate Beaton’s first picture book, The Princess and the Pony, which comes out at the end of June.

(more…)

Book review: Between You & Me: Confessions of a Comma Queen, by Mary Norris

Norris-cover-By Laura Godfrey

Part memoir and part thoughtful guide to grammar and punctuation, Between You & Me: Confessions of a Comma Queen is Mary Norris’s tribute to her decades as a copy editor for The New Yorker. Her new book, which is often funny and personal but also delves deeply into common linguistic challenges (that versus which, restrictive clauses, dangling participles), would make a fine addition to any language lover’s bookshelf, right next to Lynne Truss’s Eats, Shoots & Leaves and Carol Fisher Saller’s The Subversive Copy Editor.

Although Norris worked odd jobs in her youth—as a foot checker at a public pool, a milk truck driver, and a mozzarella packager—she has been at The New Yorker for more than 35 years and will likely remain for many more.

“One of the things I like about my job is that it draws on the entire person: not just your knowledge of grammar and punctuation and usage and foreign languages and literature but also your experience of travel, gardening, shipping, singing, plumbing, Catholicism, Midwesternism, mozzarella, the A train, New Jersey,” she writes. “And in turn it feeds you more experience.” (more…)

The Nitpicker’s Nook: January’s linguistic links roundup

The Nitpicker’s Nook is a monthly collection of language-related articles, interviews, and blog posts from around the Web. If you read something that would make a good addition, email your suggestion to [email protected].

By Laura GodfreyThe Nitpicker's Nook

  • If you know a new author too timid to say no to a copy editor’s suggestions, share this article by YA author Chantel Guertin that emphasizes the difference between being a difficult author to work with and politely asserting your own artistic vision. (Open Book: Toronto)
  • Earlier this month at the “Super Bowl of linguistics,” linguists at the American Dialect Society voted on 2014’s Word of the Year. What they chose—the influential Twitter hashtag #blacklivesmatter—stretches the definition of what constitutes a “word,” but speaks to the importance of recognizing the racial injustice that drew global attention in Ferguson, Mo. (The New York Times)
  • If you have recently launched your own freelance editorial business, you know that spending time on marketing to potential clients is vital to your success. Check out this article on four marketing mistakes to avoid. (An American Editor)
  • How long would it have taken you to notice that this rug in a sheriff’s office in Florida actually says “In Dog We Trust”? That rug manufacturer’s misprint went unnoticed for two months. Click the link to see a photo of the rug in question. (The Washington Post)

(more…)

The Nitpicker’s Nook: December’s linguistic links roundup

The Nitpicker’s Nook is a monthly collection of language-related articles, interviews, and blog posts from around the Web. If you read something that would make a good addition, email your suggestion to [email protected].

The Nitpicker's NookBy Laura Godfrey

  • You know an editor’s work is important, but did you know not hiring an editor could land you in small claims court? That’s what one Halifax graphic designer learned when he created a restaurant menu riddled with typos. (CBC News)
  •  Are you up to date on your box-related vocabulary? Think inside the box and try this fun, fill-in-the-blank Boxing Day quiz. (Copyediting.com)
  • Writer and editor Beth Bates is proud her children love literature, but laments that she “raised two grammar-rule snobs pained by a grammar-oblivious generation.” She’s learned that instead of posting those “gotcha” comments after spotting an online typo, it’s more important to read for knowledge and pleasure.  (Read>Play>Edit)
  • Did you know that early-bird rates are available until February 28, 2015, for EAC’s Editing Goes Global international conference, happening June 12–14 in downtown Toronto? This conference will feature speakers from the U.S., the U.K., Ireland, Australia, New Zealand, and Canada. (EAC)

(more…)

The Daily Grind: Toronto café The Rustic Owl

The Daily Grind is an ongoing mini-feature that highlights the best cafés in Toronto for freelance editors looking for a caffeine fix and a temporary office away from home.

Rustic OwlBy Laura Godfrey

The Rustic Owl offers a perfectly laid-back environment with ample seating and décor that lives up to the café’s name: various sizes of wooden tables, bare light bulbs that hang from the ceiling, and painted turquoise chairs that add a splash of colour, plus a vintage Underwood typewriter on display. The menu includes a decent selection of sandwiches and burritos (about $7–$9, with a small salad), all-day brunch items, and drinks that range from lattés and cappuccinos to teas and juices. A small crowd of locals can usually be found here during the day working away on their laptops or chatting with a friend, with no pressure from the staff to move on and take their work elsewhere. The space also doubles as an art gallery and event venue—paintings (owl-themed or otherwise) from local artists hang on the walls, and the café often hosts live music, comedy, and literary events in the evenings after closing time.

Wi-Fi network name: Rustic Owl II
Number of tables: 15
Number of power outlets: Available near almost every table
993 Bloor St. W., open Mon.–Sun. 10:30 AM–5 PM

Laura Godfrey is a Toronto-based copy editor, book reviewer, and editor-in-chief of EAC Toronto branch’s BoldFace blog.

This article was copy edited by Ana Trask.

March speaker Q&A: Indexer and editor Marnie Lamb

Marnie LambNow that this month’s EAC Toronto branch meeting is almost upon us, we wanted to get you acquainted with Marnie Lamb, who will be giving a presentation all about indexing on March 25. What are the mechanics of creating an index? What type of reader uses an index? Marnie will discuss these questions in the context of her experience indexing Michael Bryant’s 28 Seconds, the memoir of a well-known and controversial Canadian politician.

Meeting details
March 25, 2014
Miles Nadal Jewish Community Centre, Room 318 (southwest corner of Spadina Avenue and Bloor Street West)
7 PM: Open discussion session for new and prospective EAC members
7:30 PM: Information session and program (Marnie Lamb’s presentation)
9 PM: Mix-and-mingle over coffee, tea, and cake
Meetings are FREE for EAC members and students, and $10 for all other attendees.

Q&A conducted by Laura Godfrey

You mention on your website that you’ve been told you have “the soul of an indexer.” What is it that you enjoy about indexing?

I love to read and to organize information. Like editing, indexing presents me with a great opportunity to be introduced to all kinds of people, places, and ideas I would not otherwise encounter. Through reading manuscripts on indexing jobs, I’ve learned about how deafness was portrayed in Victorian literature, how to make high schools safe for sexual-minority students, and how Canada’s wartime prime ministers each governed. I’ve grown both intellectually and emotionally by better understanding others’ perspectives. I am also constantly creating lists: lists of my clothing, of the movies I’ve watched, of the books I’ve read. The lists are not simple, either. My clothing list, for example, is broken down by season and type of garment and arranged in rainbow order (green tops are listed before blue). Indexing is the perfect marriage of my bibliophilia and my anal-retentiveness!

(more…)

January speaker Q&A: Nina Munteanu, ecologist and author

Nina MunteanuOur first members’ meeting of the year for EAC’s Toronto branch is coming up soon, so we wanted to give you a taste of what to expect from this month’s speaker. Nina Munteanu is an ecologist and internationally published author of award-nominated speculative novels, short stories, and non-fiction. She is co-editor of Europa SF and currently teaches writing courses at George Brown College and the University of Toronto. Nina has been coaching writers through the process of successful publication for over a decade and gives workshops to writers on editing, marketing, and promotion.

In Nina’s presentation, “Keeping Up with the Changing Face of Publishing: What it Means for Freelance Editors,” you’ll learn about different forms of publishing (including self-publishing and indie publishing), publishing myths, where to find new editing opportunities, and how to market and promote yourself to writers who need your help.

Meeting details
January 28, 2014
Miles Nadal Jewish Community Centre, Room 318 (southwest corner of Spadina Avenue and Bloor Street West)
7 PM: Open discussion session for new and prospective EAC members
7:30 PM: Information session and program (Nina Munteanu’s presentation)
9 PM: Mix-and-mingle over coffee, tea, and cake
Meetings are FREE for EAC members and students, and $10 for all other attendees.

Q&A conducted by Laura Godfrey

Why do you think self-publishing and indie publishing have grown more popular recently compared to larger, more traditional book publishers?

I think it’s because we’ve grown out of that constricted and limited model. The traditional model consisted of the following scenario: a reputable publishing house screened works by hopeful writers and determined what got published and how, based on the current market; books were typically sold to bookstores via a distributor; what the bookstore didn’t sell, it sent back to the publisher. Publishers relied on reviews from professional sites and traditional marketing to sell their top authors.

(more…)