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Manage your stress: Tips for freelancers

By Emily Chau

Manage your stress: Tips for freelancersMost people are more stressed than they’d wish, and work is often the reason. If you’re working as a freelance editor, you’re probably also feeling the pressure of running your own business 24/7.

A small amount of stress is healthy if it keeps you focused and challenged, but a large amount can lead to restlessness, eating problems, insomnia, depression, and relationship issues. Worse, it can also lower your quality of work and reduce your productivity.

Although the symptoms of stress are not always dramatic, it’s important to minimize your stress so it doesn’t become worse. Read on for tips on ways freelance editors can avoid or reduce work-related stress. (more…)

The Nitpicker’s Nook: November’s linguistic links roundup

The Nitpicker’s Nook is a monthly collection of language-related articles, interviews, and blog posts from around the Web. If you read something that would make a good addition, email your suggestion to [email protected].

The Nitpicker's NookBy Emily Chau

  • If you weren’t already convinced of the importance of proofreading, take a look at this major gaffe in an academic paper where a candid in-text query—“should we cite the crappy Gabor paper here?”—was unintentionally published. This cringe-worthy mistake also highlights the importance of being diplomatic in your query notes. (Slate)
  • Are you a freelance editor with a Twitter account? Do you actively use it to engage with your clients? Here’s a delightful blog post on why editors love Twitter. (SfEP)
  • How well do you know your grammar? Writer and editor John E. McIntyre, one of the speakers at EAC’s Conference 2015—Editing Goes Global, posted a quick grammar quiz online. Test your knowledge now! (Baltimore Sun)
  • Our fellow EAC British Columbia branch participated in Communication Convergence in October, held in partnership with the Society for Technical Communication, to recognize and celebrate International Plain Language Day. (West Coast Editor)

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The Nitpicker’s Nook: October’s linguistic links roundup

The Nitpicker’s Nook is a monthly collection of language-related articles, interviews, and blog posts from around the Web. If you read something that would make a good addition, email your suggestion to [email protected].

The Nitpicker's NookBy Emily Chau

  • As we celebrated Thanksgiving in October, what were you thankful for? Valued EAC member Frances Peck wrote an article on giving thanks for plain language in Canada. Find out why and see what other resources you can tap into. (West Coast Editors)
  • Copy and paste much? Have you ever gotten distracted and copied something else over your original copied text, losing it from the clipboard? EAC member Iva Cheung introduces a new program called Jumpcut in her blog entry. (Iva Cheung)
  • Hey, proofreaders! Do you still need to learn proof-correction symbols when most work is done onscreen these days? See what Louise Harnby, member of the Society for Editors and Proofreaders, has to say in her blog. (Louise Harnby | Proofreader)

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The Nitpicker’s Nook: September’s linguistic links roundup

The Nitpicker’s Nook is a monthly collection of language-related articles, interviews, and blog posts from around the Web. If you read something that would make a good addition, email your suggestion to [email protected].

The Nitpicker's NookBy Emily Chau

  • Want to stock up on a few Canadian books, but don’t know where to start? Make it a fun and easy task with 49th Shelf, a Canadian site that is both free and interactive. (49th Shelf)
  • The passive voice has been disparaged time and time again, but sometimes it is the better choice. Do you agree with this author? And can you identify the passive voice in this linguistic quiz? (The Week)
  • By putting a “y” at the end of a noun or verb, you have made an unfamiliar adjective. Do you do this a lot? (The Chronicle of Higher Education)
  • An American Editor returns with a blog entry on how proofreading is sometimes viewed as a lesser skill than copy editing. Is this true, or is it all a matter of experience and specific projects? (An American Editor)

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The Nitpicker’s Nook: August’s linguistic links roundup

The Nitpicker’s Nook is a monthly collection of language-related articles, interviews, and blog posts from around the Web. If you read something that would make a good addition, email your suggestion to [email protected].

The Nitpicker's NookBy Emily Chau

  • Canada doesn’t have its own dictionary, since the final edition of the Canadian Oxford Dictionary was published 10 years ago, so who is speaking up for Canadian English? (Globe and Mail)
  • Peter Midgley won the Editors’ Association of Canada’s Tom Fairley Award for Editorial Excellence for his work on The Last Temptation of Bond, the award-winning poetry book by Kimmy Beach. Have a quick look at his conversation with Adrienne Montgomerie. (Copyediting.com)
  • Do you go away during summer to a cabin, or to a cottage? Do you drink soft drinks, or do you drink pop? Read this article on variations in Canadian English and see how our tongues are tied by geography — know your regional identity. (Metro News)
  • A brand new tool for all editors and Canadians! The Centre for Equitable Library Access, a new national, non-profit organization, is now providing reading materials in formats such as Braille, audio, and e-text. Canadians with print disabilities can now enjoy access to over 230,000 books, magazines, and newspapers! (Language Portal of Canada)
  • Camilla Gibb, the award-winning author of Mouthing the Words and The Beauty of Humanity Movement, recalls the toughest criticism an editor ever gave her. Check out this article to see how it transformed her writing. (CBC Books)

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The Nitpicker’s Nook: June’s linguistic links roundup

The Nitpicker’s Nook is a monthly collection of language-related articles, interviews, and blog posts from around the Web. If you read something that would make a good addition, email your suggestion to [email protected].

The Nitpicker's NookBy Emily Chau

  • The Canadian Intellectual Property Office has formed a new group on LinkedIn. Join in to learn a thing or two! (LinkedIn)
  • Do you learn best with graphics? Here’s a neat infographic on the Oxford comma, with arguments for and against using the divisive punctuation mark. (Daily Infographic)
  • The Canadian Agricultural Library has digitized many of its documents. Here’s a great source for all editors. (Archive.org)
  • Are “old” ways the better way? What about marketing? Here’s a new blog entry with 10 reasons to write a snail-mail letter, and five things to do with multiple tools and channels. (Society for Editors and Proofreaders)

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The Nitpicker’s Nook: May’s linguistic links roundup

The Nitpicker’s Nook is a monthly collection of language-related articles, interviews, and blog posts from around the Web. If you read something that would make a good addition, email your suggestion to [email protected].

The Nitpicker's NookBy Emily Chau

  • Another reason to go to the EAC Conference: write off the conference costs! Adrienne Montgomerie, a long-time EAC member, shares her tax tips with freelancers in this article. (Copyediting.com)
  • Science editors alert! The Plants of Canada Database is an updated source of information about natural, vascular plants in Canada. Check out this quick and accessible tool for more information on both native and introduced species in the Canadian flora. (Canadian Food Inspection Agency)
  • Check out this cool presentation from Ryan O’Connor (a.k.a. Chelsea Tech Guy), who has provided a free recording of his presentation, “Get Your Head in the Cloud: Modern Tools for Modern Editors” from our EAC colleagues out in the National Capital Region during April’s speaker night in Ottawa. (EAC-NCR Bulletin)
  • Since some of our editors are also translators, here’s a cheat sheet on Twitter hashtags for that line of work. (Lingoio)
  • If someone sternly insists that it’s wrong to use a certain word a certain way, is it pickiness or precision? An assistant editor in London shares his thoughts with us on his blog. (The Stroppy Editor)

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The Nitpicker’s Nook: April’s linguistic links roundup

The Nitpicker’s Nook is a monthly collection of language-related articles, interviews, and blog posts from around the Web. If you read something that would make a good addition, email your suggestion to [email protected].

The Nitpicker's NookBy Emily Chau

  • Freelancers: when will you start making money? Is freelancing full-time sustainable? This article explores specific factors that determine a freelancer’s salary and how salaries vary for each individual. (The Proofreader’s Parlour)
  • Do you use social media to market your business? This quick read will give you some perspective on when to post, what to post, and how to improve. (Buffer)
  • Read this fascinating article on the differences between French- and English-Canadian reactions to branding communications on social media. (eMarketer)
  • Are you a word nerd? Further to an article published on Ragan.com, “15 signs you’re a word nerd,” we head to Irishman Stan Carey’s latest blog entry on the language police. (Sentence First)
  • Time for a little word history from CBS News! This video and accompanying article explore the origin and many uses of the versatile word OK. (CBS News)

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