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Editor for Life: Carolyn Camilleri, editor and writer

Interview conducted by Jennifer D. Foster.

A career as an editor is often a solo adventure, especially if you’re a freelancer. So we thought one way to better connect with fellow editors was to ask them the W5: who, what, where, when, and why. Read on for some thought-provoking, enlightening tidbits from those of us who choose to work with words to earn our keep.

Photo of Carolyn Camilleri

Please tell us a little about yourself, the kind of work you do (and where you live), and how long you’ve been an editor.

I am a freelance writer and editor based mostly in Toronto but also in Victoria. I have been doing this work since 1996, and I have been self-employed since 1998. I write for and edit magazines, mostly custom and trade publications now, but I have a few consumer magazines on my resumé. I especially enjoy launching and rebranding publications; it’s a lot of work, but it’s exciting and fun. I also help businesses with websites, marketing materials, and anything else they have that might need new words or better words.

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Editor for Life: JF Garrard, Deputy Editor for Ricepaper Magazine

Interview conducted by Jennifer D. Foster.

A career as an editor is often a solo adventure, especially if you’re a freelancer. So we thought one way to better connect with fellow editors was to ask them the W5: who, what, where, when, and why. Read on for some thought-provoking, enlightening tidbits from those of us who choose to work with words to earn our keep.

Please tell us a little about yourself, the kind of work you do (and where you live), and how long you’ve been an editor.

I’m a publisher and writer of speculative fiction, based in Toronto. I fell into editing in 2014 when Derwin Mak (fellow writer/editor) told me that an Asian-Canadian magazine called Ricepaper Magazine wanted to create a speculative fiction issue but didn’t have enough people to do it. I volunteered to help, and we edited an issue together in record time! In 2017, I was recruited by Ricepaper to help with writing film reviews, marketing, and coordinating events. In 2018, my role progressed to editorial and administrative work. My tasks now involve editing, interviewing potential editors, networking, coordinating events, and leading the production work for books and magazines. In parallel timelines, for my own press, Dark Helix Press, I began working on different anthology projects with editorial teams. Over time, I’ve learned a lot from leading projects and working with many diverse editors on magazine and book production. At the moment, I’m also in the middle of finishing up courses for a creative writing certificate from Ryerson University.

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Thank you to our volunteers!

Red card with the words "thank you" on it next to a fountain pen.

Photo by Aaron Burden on Unsplash

Editors Toronto is part of a national professional association run by and for its members. Everything you see, read, and attend is organized and coordinated by volunteers.

We have had over 30 unique volunteers this season, many of them volunteering on more than one occasion. Volunteers are vital to the success of Editors Toronto. Everything we do is possible because of our volunteers. Thank you for your time, your positive attitude, and your willingness to serve this branch. This is truly a team effort.

The Editors Toronto’s executive would like to thank you for making 2018 such a great year, and we look forward to working with all of you again in 2019!

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Post-script: Professional Editorial Standards in action

By Michelle Waitzman

Anyone who has considered (or completed) any of the Editors Canada certifications has probably reviewed Professional Editorial Standards (PES). But how were these standards developed, and what do they have to do with the day-to-day tasks of editors and proofreaders?

Editors Toronto’s November program looked at PES through the eyes of four editors, each working at a different career stage and/or in a different editing niche. The speakers made it clear that the standards involve much more than taking tests; they are a practical and evolving guide to professional editing, which editors can use in a variety of ways.

The program started with an overview and history of PES from experienced freelance editor and instructor Elizabeth d’Anjou. Editors Canada first began discussing the standards in the early 1980s, and Elizabeth’s mother was a member of the committee that first created the standards, so Elizabeth practically grew up with them!

One of Editors Canada’s early goals was to set up a certification program so that professional editors could be easily identified (and their work properly valued) by potential clients. But before the organization could create a test for editors, it first had to define what it was testing. They considered questions such as the following: What skills are important? What tasks should editors know how to do? What kind of industry knowledge should they be expected to have? PES was created to answer these types of questions—a task that took many years and involved a number of consultations with members. The standards were not only important for informing a certification program, they were also a key tool for Editors Canada to use to raise awareness about editing as a profession and to explain what editors do.

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Thank you to our volunteers in 2017–18!

Editors Toronto is part of a national professional association run by and for its members. Everything you see, read, and attend is organized and co-ordinated by volunteers.

During the 2017–18 season we had over 60 unique volunteers, many of them volunteering on more than one occasion. Volunteers are vital to the success of Editors Toronto. Everything we do is possible because of our volunteers. Thank you for your time, your positive attitude, and your willingness to serve this branch. This is truly a team effort.

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Editor for Life: Jennifer Croll, editorial director of Greystone Books and author

Interview conducted by Jennifer D. Foster

A career as an editor is often a solo adventure, especially if you’re a freelancer. So, we thought one way to better connect with fellow editors was to ask them the W5: who, what, where, when, and why. Read on for some thought-provoking, enlightening tidbits from those of us who choose to work with words to earn our keep.

Jennifer Croll

 

Jennifer, please tell us a little about yourself, the kind of work you do (where you live), and how long you’ve been an editor.

I’m one of those odd birds who is both a writer and an editor, and I’ve been doing both professionally for about 14 years. I attended the master of publishing program at SFU, and after graduating my first jobs were in magazines—a field where it’s easy to both write and edit. I published my first book, Fashion That Changed the World, in 2014, and began working at Greystone Books in Vancouver soon after. I’m now Greystone’s editorial director, and spend my days editing and acquiring books and managing the editorial department. I write books at night, and will be publishing my third and fourth books in 2018 and 2019.

Who: If you could edit one famous author, living or dead, who would it be?

I’ll say Dorothy Parker. I’m sure she’d be a handful, but I’d get some stories out of it.

What: Do you have a favourite punctuation mark and/or a favourite word?

That’s a diplomatic question. Editors, from what I know, spend most of their time hating certain words and punctuation marks! I’ll offer you a favourite letter instead: ø. I just finished working on a book written by Norwegians, and I grew quite fond of the slashed o.

Where: If you could work anywhere in the world as an editor, where would that be?

From a luxurious mansion in the south of France, paid for with the millions of dollars I’ve made editing.

When: Was there ever a time in your life when you seriously questioned your career choice?

Yes—in the aftermath of the financial crisis in 2008, when I was freelancing and there was very little work. I’m very glad I didn’t retrain to become a dental hygienist.

Why: Why did you choose to become an editor? Or, should we ask: Why did editing choose you? 

 After I finished my undergrad degree, I moved to London, England, and looked for a job. It was the first time in my life I’d needed to consider my actual skill set. I saw a job posting for an editorial assistant, thought, “I could do that,” and applied. I had a job on my third day in the country, jet lag be damned. That pretty much settled my fate.

And, of course, we just had to ask the inevitable how: How would you sum up your motto?

Just like that 1970s poster featuring a kitten hanging on for dear life, “Hang in there.”

Jennifer D. Foster is a Toronto-based freelance editor and writer, specializing in book and custom publishing, magazines, and marketing and communications. She is also chair of Editors Toronto and administrative director of the Rowers Reading Series.

This article was copy edited by Nicole North.

 

 

Thank you to our volunteers!

Editors Toronto is part of a national professional association run by and for its members. Everything you see, read, and attend is organized and co-ordinated by volunteers. As editor-in-chief of BoldFace, I want to acknowledge all the volunteers who have contributed their skills, time, and talent to helping me make this blog an interesting, informative, fun place for readers. And thanks to everyone who helped at events and brought their expertise to bear. The executive committee and I thank you for making 2017 such a great year, and we look forward to working with all of you again in 2018!

BoldFace copy editors and writers

Christine Albert (copy editing, writing)
Joe Cotterchio-Milligan (copy editing)
Ellen Fleischer (copy editing)
Jennifer D. Foster (writing)
James Harbeck (writing)
Deepi Harish (writing)
Emma Warnken Johnson (writing)
Karen Kemlo (copy editing)
Afara Kimkeran (copy editing)
Ambrose Li (copy editing)
Shara Love (writing)
Jaye Marsh (copy editing, writing)
Tom Nicholls (copy editing)
Nicole North (copy editing)
Jeny Nussey (copy editing)
Berna Ozunal (writing)
Olga Sushinsky (copy editing)
Alethea Spiridon (writing)
Rachel Stuckey (writing)
Ana Trask (copy editing)
Jessica Trudel (writing)
Michelle Waitzman (writing)
Avivah Wargon (writing)
Vanessa Wells (copy editing)

BoldFace editors for life

Stephanie Fysh
Patrick Geraghty
Greg Ioannou
Marnie Lamb
Jeanne McKane
Wilf Popoff
Sara Scharf
Sally Sparrow
Suzanne Sutherland
Heather J. Wood

Branch meeting helpers

Nadia Aftab
Mel Bender
Marina Demetriou
Adrineh Der-Boghossian
Sue Gargiulo
Aquin George
Raya P. Morrison
Danielle Putinja
Erika Westman
Michelle Waitzman

Branch-meetings panellists

Jennifer Albert (non-member)
Carolyn Camilleri
Donovan Dill (non-member)
Jennifer D. Foster
Jayne S. Huhtanen (non-member)
Anne-Marie Jackson (non-member)
Marnie Lamb
Jeanne McKane
Nicole Roccas
Andrew Tolson (non-member)
Katie Underwood (non-member)

The Word On The Street helpers

Ruth Chernia
Catherine Dorton
Kerry Fast
Jennifer D. Foster
Ellen Keeble
Bob Kennedy
Deven Knill
Robin Marwick

Join us for holiday cheer!

Happy Holidays

The chill in the air says it’s that time of year! Let’s get together for some holiday cheer.

 

What better way to celebrate the holidays and the end of 2017 than by swapping stories and sharing some laughs with your colleagues? Seize this opportunity to relax and review the year among friends. Members are welcome to bring a guest.

 

Where: The Pickle Barrel, 312 Yonge St. (Yonge and Dundas)

When: Tuesday, December 12, 2017, at 6:30 PM

 

Attendees pay for their own dinner and drinks.

 

RSVP by December 10, 2017.

 

Note: The Pickle Barrel is fully accessible, has a varied menu to accommodate food preferences, and validates parking. 

 

For elevators: Enter through The Atrium doors (just north of The Pickle Barrel entrance on Yonge Street).