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The Nitpicker’s Nook: June’s linguistic links roundup

The Nitpicker’s Nook is a monthly collection of language-related articles, interviews, and blog posts. If you read something that would make a good addition, email your suggestion to [email protected].

By Savanna Scott Leslie

The Nitpicker’s Nook: June’s linguistic links roundup

  • That’s a wrap on the 2016 Editors Canada conference in Vancouver! Paul Cipywnyk shared his photos from the event so you can relive those memories, or see what you missed. (Flickr)
  • Across the pond, the Society for Editors and Proofreaders (SfEP) held a professional development day for fiction editors. Editor Liz Jones discusses some takeaways from the big day. (Eat Sleep Edit Repeat)
  • Brexit: the fun new portmanteau that everyone’s worrying about. And if, like me, you edit in the finance world, you’ve probably seen the term a lot. Linguist Mark Liberman muses on different pronunciations of the trendy word in John Oliver’s must-see Brexit segment from Last Week Tonight, which you can watch within the article. I’m in the [‘brɛk.sɪt] camp. What about you? (Language Log)
  • Perhaps all the complaints about “females” in pop culture have put you off the word entirely and you’ve begun to use “women” as an adjective instead. You wouldn’t be alone. Mignon Fogarty weighs in on the practice, and the sexism that may have caused it, before sharing a practical suggestion. (Grammar Girl)
  • How much do you consider syntax in your edits? Emma Darwin explores the “rhythm, reason, and rhyme” behind strong sentences. (The Itch of Writing: The Blog)
  • As I’ve been learning from Alec Ross’s The Industries of the Future (2016), automation and mechanization will quickly reshape the economic landscape. These changes should improve our health and increase leisure time—but they’ll also allow companies to drastically cut jobs. Stay calm! A recent report suggests writing and editing jobs in Canada are unlikely to be automated in the next 10 to 20 years. (The Globe and Mail)

Savanna Scott Leslie is an editor and publishing consultant based in Hamilton, Ontario. She’s also a new and enthusiastic co-coordinator of Editors Hamilton-Halton, though she can’t help but shudder at the word co-coordinator.

This article was copy edited by Joe Cotterchio-Milligan.

The Nitpicker’s Nook: May’s linguistic links roundup

The Nitpicker’s Nook is a monthly collection of language-related articles, interviews, and blog posts. If you read something that would make a good addition, email your suggestion to [email protected].

By Savanna Scott Leslie

The Nitpicker’s Nook: May’s linguistic links roundup

  • Online tools make plagiarism easier to catch, but plagiarism is still a delicate subject to broach with writers. Adrienne Montgomerie shares some tips that you might find useful next time you query plagiarism. (Copyediting.com)
  • Beyond plagiarism, sharing feedback with writers can be tough in general! Emma Darwin offers some great advice for ensuring that your feedback is not only respectful, but useful. (This Itch Of Writing: The Blog)
  • Bryan Garner’s The Chicago Guide to Grammar, Usage, and Punctuation came out this month. If you’re not sure whether to pick up a copy, you should check out Richard Adin’s review. (An American Editor)
  • Following up on Adin’s April post about the value of editing, Karin Cather calls for uniform copyediting certification. She proposes universal testing because “it does the profession an injustice when we say that anyone should be able to say they are an editor, even though they have no education, training, or experience.” (Plainly Spoken)
  • The value of editing services may not always be as clear to potential business partners as we’d like, but it becomes especially evident when a grammatical mistake completely reverses the intended meaning. Is that always such a bad thing? Here’s one example where a lack of editing may have changed the Texas Republican Party’s homophobic platform for the better. (NPR)*
  • Rachele Kanigel, the Society of Professional Journalists, and other contributors have released the Diversity Style Guide. This guide to best practices for discussing ethnicity, gender, sexuality, disability, and more is available for free online. (Diversity Style Guide)
  • Conference season is almost upon us! Have you registered for the Editors Canada National Conference on June 10–12 in Vancouver? If you’re on the fence about professional conferences, check out Carol Fisher Saller’s “Should You Attend an Editing Conference?” (The Subversive Copy Editor)

*Thanks to Sara Scharf for submitting this link.

Savanna Scott Leslie is an editor and publishing consultant based in Hamilton, Ontario. She’s also a new and enthusiastic co-coordinator of Editors Hamilton-Halton, and she can’t help but shudder at the word co-coordinator.

This article was copy edited by Nicole North.  

Where you’ll find me at #Editors2016

By Jaclyn Law

Where you’ll find me at #Editors2016

So many conference sessions, so few time slots! It’s impossible to be everywhere, so I chose topics that are right for my business and day-to-day work, right now. My picks (shared below) lean towards technology-related topics, but where are you going?

  • “Editing Copy for the Mobile Web and App Development,” Christina Vasilevski
    Mobile tech fascinates me. My partner is a mobile developer, and occasionally I get a glimpse of what’s involved in putting together effective, intuitive mobile sites and apps that people actually enjoy using. I’d love to find projects in this space.
  • “Editing for the Web Without Lowering Your Standards,” Erin Brenner
    I already work with website copy, and I’m hoping to pick up lots of pointers at this session. Clients sometimes ask me about best practices for web copy—a good example of how the role of the editor is expanding. Who better to learn from than the editor-in-chief of Copyediting.com?

(more…)

Top events for editors: June to December 2016

By Olga Sushinsky

Top events for editors: June to December 2016

Are you an editor looking for opportunities to network with your fellow colleagues or potential clients? Perhaps you are at the beginning or middle of your editing career and are wondering about other options, such as business writing or indexing. No matter what your goals are, there are still plenty of events that you can attend this year.

Editors Canada national conference, Vancouver, BC, June 10–12

Anyone serious about embarking on a career in editing should attend the Editors Canada national conference at least once in their lifetime. Every year, the association organizes a conference devoted to editing work. Previous conference themes/topics have included editing and technology, global editing, and book indexing. This year’s conference will focus on the business side of editing. New freelancers will greatly benefit from this event, as sessions will cover such topics as finding and keeping clients, managing the business side of freelancing, and editing various media, from web communications to self-published books. Pre-conference seminars will include PDF editing, efficient document production, and editorial design basics. During the conference, you’ll have a chance to meet colleagues from across Canada, former classmates from your continuing education courses, and, of course, experienced editing professionals who you can connect with. (more…)