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The Nitpicker’s Nook: July’s linguistic links roundup

The Nitpicker’s Nook is a monthly collection of language-related articles, interviews, and blog posts from around the Web. If you read something that would make a good addition, email your suggestion to [email protected].

By Robin MarwickThe Nitpicker's Nook

  • Too much work, too little focus? Cartoonist Katie McKissick found herself battling burnout and came up with some novel ways to beat it. (Symbiartic)
  • Editing Goes Global is long over, but that doesn’t mean you can’t still learn from it. The organizers have collected all the recaps they could find and put them on one page. Don’t miss the link to the session handouts! (Editors Canada)
  • If you’re like most editors, you want to do your absolute best with every project that comes your way, but that’s sometimes easier said than done. Rich Adin discusses some keys to high-quality editing, starting with the decision whether to accept a project or not. (An American Editor)
  • Freelance editing has its joys and its crises: for starters, no work, too much work, or finding out you’ve made a catastrophic error. Liz Dexter discusses what to do in six common freelance crisis situations, including how to prevent them from happening again. (LibroEditing.com)
  • Speaking of errors, yes, even editors make them. Arlene Prunkl looks at when to freak out, when to let an error go, and when to be a little kinder to ourselves and others (hint: all the time). (Penultimate Word)
  • Testimonials from satisfied clients are a persuasive marketing tool. Adrienne Montgomerie suggests easy, effective ways to get them and explains what to do with testimonials when you have them. (Copyediting.com)
  • Some writing rules are made to be broken, especially in fiction. Here are 20. (Emma Darwin)

Robin Marwick is a Toronto-based freelance editor, medical writer, content strategist, and dog lover.

This article was copy edited by Valerie Borden.

The Nitpicker’s Nook: June’s linguistic links roundup

The Nitpicker’s Nook is a monthly collection of language-related articles, interviews, and blog posts from around the Web. If you read something that would make a good addition, email your suggestion to [email protected].

By Robin MarwickThe Nitpicker's Nook

If you’re a Toronto editor who didn’t go to Editing Goes Global on the weekend of June 12 to 14, you missed out on a weekend filled with more great sessions than any one person could attend. Fortunately, quite a few people tweeted and blogged about their weekend, so those who couldn’t make it can still learn.

  • Sarah Grey presented a session on inclusive editing: the art of making sure that language doesn’t hurt people. (Grey Editing)
  • Adrienne Montgomerie and Cheryl Stephens discussed the elusive art of editing visuals, including graphs and illustrations, and ensuring that they are as clear and useful as the text they accompany. (Iva Cheung)
  • James Harbeck gave a talk on the many possible reasons to use “bad” English. (Sesquiotica)
  • Teresa Schmedding and Karen Martwick discussed “triage editing.” In an ideal world, we would all have time to make sure everything we edit is perfect; of course, this is not an ideal world. Schmedding and Martwick’s goal is to bring evidence, rather than hunches, to editors’ decision-making. (Copydesk.org)

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The Nitpicker’s Nook: December’s linguistic links roundup

The Nitpicker’s Nook is a monthly collection of language-related articles, interviews, and blog posts from around the Web. If you read something that would make a good addition, email your suggestion to [email protected].

The Nitpicker's NookBy Laura Godfrey

  • You know an editor’s work is important, but did you know not hiring an editor could land you in small claims court? That’s what one Halifax graphic designer learned when he created a restaurant menu riddled with typos. (CBC News)
  •  Are you up to date on your box-related vocabulary? Think inside the box and try this fun, fill-in-the-blank Boxing Day quiz. (Copyediting.com)
  • Writer and editor Beth Bates is proud her children love literature, but laments that she “raised two grammar-rule snobs pained by a grammar-oblivious generation.” She’s learned that instead of posting those “gotcha” comments after spotting an online typo, it’s more important to read for knowledge and pleasure.  (Read>Play>Edit)
  • Did you know that early-bird rates are available until February 28, 2015, for EAC’s Editing Goes Global international conference, happening June 12–14 in downtown Toronto? This conference will feature speakers from the U.S., the U.K., Ireland, Australia, New Zealand, and Canada. (EAC)

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