BoldFace

Home » Posts tagged 'Ambrose Li'

Tag Archives: Ambrose Li

Save your eyes! Tips to reduce computer-related eye strain

Monitor glare

By Michelle Waitzman

Working in front of a computer monitor all day, as most editors do, takes a toll on your eyes. Here are some tips on how to reduce the eye strain that can lead to fatigue, headaches, dry eyes, and loss of concentration.

Beware of Glare

Glare is caused by light reflecting off your monitor and into your eyes. It can come from your windows or from light fixtures and lamps. Glare makes it harder to read your documents, reduces contrast, and can reflect bright spots into your eyes causing you to squint. It’s best to reduce glare at the source, but if that isn’t possible you can purchase an anti-glare screen to attach to your monitor.

Glare from daylight can usually be fixed by moving your monitor to a better position. Your monitor should be perpendicular to the window in the room, so that the daylight hits it from the side. Placing your monitor in front of the window will cause the backlighting to be too strong, which makes your monitor appear dark. Placing your monitor across from the window will cause the most direct glare.

Even with the monitor angled correctly to the window, glare can be an issue when the sun is low in the sky. Curtains or blinds are the best way to control the amount of daylight entering the room. (more…)

The Nitpicker’s Nook: February edition

The Nitpicker's Nook, Carol Harrison

The Nitpicker’s Nook is a monthly collection of language-related articles, interviews, and blog posts. If you read something that would make a good addition, email your suggestion to [email protected]

By Carol Harrison

Does the current state of world affairs leave you without words? Thankfully Planet Word, the soon-to-be museum of linguistics in Washington, DC, won’t be. And did you know there is also a National Museum of Mathematics in New York? For me, both celebrate languages.

On January 14, Zhou Youguang died at 111 years old. If you’ve learned to read and write Mandarin using Hanyu Pinyin, you have him to thank.

Pardon me while I geek out. I can’t say enough good things about the movie Arrival, directed by Denis Villeneuve. Finally, a science-fiction film that’s about communicating with aliens, not shooting them up! If you’ve watched the trailer, you’ve seen a sample of how the language looks. Wired’s Margaret Rhodes talks to the people who created the alphabet. Oh, and a shout-out to Jessica Coon, an associate professor of linguistics at McGill University and Canada Research Chair in Syntax and Indigenous Languages, who consulted on the film! Now I’m off to find Ted Chiang’s 1998 novella “Story of Your Life” on which all this is based.

Back down to earth, or perhaps flying a few feet above the ground, the BBC’s Andrew Evans finds out how falconry sank its talons into the English language.

Have current events got you riled? Do you plan to join a march? Want your placard to pack extra punch? Let linguist Daniel Midgley help.

Carol Harrison is editor-in-chief of BoldFace and freelance editor and writer at Muse Ink. When she isn’t focusing on words, she’s focusing her Nikon D3200.

This article was copy edited by Ambrose Li.

Is it art? Well, how does it feel?

Illustration: Niklas Elmehed. Copyright: Nobel Media AB 2016

Illustration: Niklas Elmehed. Copyright: Nobel Media AB 2016

By James Harbeck

There has been much discussion of the Nobel Prize in Literature being awarded to Bob Dylan. I have no interest in weighing in on whether his work is Nobel quality—I won’t pretend to understand the judges’ criteria—but I do have some thoughts on the question of whether a songwriter is even eligible to be awarded the prize.

There is no Nobel Prize in music, or in songwriting. So we can’t say that he should be considered for a different category unless you think songwriting is more appropriate to the Peace Prize, or perhaps to Economics. No, if he’s getting a prize, Literature is it. The question is whether songs qualify as literature—whether, to be frank, they’re good enough, or whether they’re “just songs.” There’s something of a privileged-genre attitude, a white-marble image of literature (that is, the truly worthy kind of text) as being cool prose in dry books that silently dissects humanity’s problems, not in the noise of a musical performance.

This has about as much basis as the white-marble image of Greek statuary, which, we now know, was originally painted bright colours. We ought to remember that the novel, as such, has only existed for a few centuries. Narrative texts pretending to any literary merit were expected to be written in verse until early modern times. And why was that? Because the written literature was, originally, the lyrics of songs and chants and declamations to music. The vaunted Greek drama had not one word that was flatly spoken. The psalms of the Bible were for singing. Beowulf was incomplete without a harp to aid the recitation. The fact that we have peeled the spoken from the sung, and ultimately the silently read from the spoken, does not have any bearing on the human insight conveyed in the words. Poetry has been deemed worthy of the Nobel: Pablo Neruda, Seamus Heaney, and Wole Soyinka have all won it, and it is terrible to think that they might have been ineligible if they had, like Leonard Cohen, been driven by economics to set their poetry to music. (more…)

Where you’ll find me at #Editors2016

By Jaclyn Law

Where you’ll find me at #Editors2016

So many conference sessions, so few time slots! It’s impossible to be everywhere, so I chose topics that are right for my business and day-to-day work, right now. My picks (shared below) lean towards technology-related topics, but where are you going?

  • “Editing Copy for the Mobile Web and App Development,” Christina Vasilevski
    Mobile tech fascinates me. My partner is a mobile developer, and occasionally I get a glimpse of what’s involved in putting together effective, intuitive mobile sites and apps that people actually enjoy using. I’d love to find projects in this space.
  • “Editing for the Web Without Lowering Your Standards,” Erin Brenner
    I already work with website copy, and I’m hoping to pick up lots of pointers at this session. Clients sometimes ask me about best practices for web copy—a good example of how the role of the editor is expanding. Who better to learn from than the editor-in-chief of Copyediting.com?

(more…)

Ask Aunt Elizabeth: How do I let my boyfriend know his manuscript sucks?

By Elizabeth d’Anjou

Looking for advice on editing the editing life? Whether you’re a beginner looking for tips on starting out or an old hand looking for another perspective, veteran editor Aunt Elizabeth is ready to address your queries. Submit them to [email protected]—you may find the answers you are looking for in next month’s column.

Ask Aunt Elizabeth: How do I let my boyfriend know his manuscript sucks?

1) Dear Aunt Elizabeth,

I’m a long-time freelance editor with a successful business in the book publishing field. My boyfriend of the last four years just finished writing a manuscript, and he asked me to read it. I have been avoiding reading it for months. I finally finished it, and my worst fears were realized: it is terrible. The plot was boring, the characters were unbelievable, and the dialogue was riddled with clichés. Do you have any suggestions on how I should approach this sensitive situation? I want to be honest, but he’s so excited about the prospect of becoming a published author, and I don’t want to crush his dream.

Thank you for your advice,
Panicked in Port Hope

Dear Panicked,

Yikes. Every editor has awkward moments related to the writing of friends and relations from time to time, but your case is particularly unfortunate! (more…)

Web accessibility: An editor’s guide

By Ambrose Li

Web accessibility: An editor’s guide

Is web accessibility for people with disabilities the responsibility of just web designers, web developers, or accessibility consultants? Editors Toronto certainly disagrees, or it wouldn’t have organized a seminar on web accessibility standards last November. But what if you missed that seminar?

Web accessibility in a nutshell

Ontario’s web accessibility standard is based on Web Content Accessibility Guidelines (WCAG) 2.0. It consists of four principles divided into 12 guidelines that together form the basis of more than 60 success criteria and over 400 techniques; it deals with not only web pages but also other kinds of content posted online, including PDFs. Its official guide, at 262 letter-sized pages, is more than five times longer than the standard itself.

This sounds intimidating, but the four principles of accessibility (perceivable, operable, understandable, and robust) and 12 guidelines that underpin the WCAG standard are surprisingly simple. And, as an editor, only two of those guidelines should catch your attention: readable and navigable. Readability is clearly the job of all editors, and navigability—organizing the site so that readers can easily glean its structure and find their way around—is central to what substantive editors do. Even when acting within traditional editorial roles, we are already qualified to meaningfully contribute to a site’s accessibility. (more…)

Editor for Life: Pietro Cammalleri, freelance editor

A career as an editor is often a solo adventure, especially if you’re a freelancer. So we thought one way to better connect with fellow editors was to ask them the W5: who, what, where, when, and why. Read on for some thought-provoking, enlightening tidbits from those of us who choose to work with words to earn our keep.

Interview conducted by Jennifer D. Foster

Editor for Life: Pietro Cammalleri, freelance editor

Pietro, please tell us a little about yourself, the kind of work you do, and how long you’ve been an editor.

I have been a Torontonian all my life, and my first paid work as a copy editor and proofreader was in 2003. Magazine publishing and advertising are the two industries in which I’ve worked the most.

As the owner of Pietro Cammalleri’s Editorial Services, I currently work anywhere from 20 to 40 hours a week, in the healthcare division of an ad agency whose clients are mostly large drug companies. The material I proofread ranges from print ads for medical journals to microsites for prescription medications. A large chunk of the “proofreading” I undertake is actually copy editing because the copy hasn’t been previously edited; surprisingly, in this role I mark up on hard copy much of the time. I also do quality assurance for iPad apps that have been tailored to client needs by checking the screens against hard-copy laser prints.

When I’m not at the ad agency, I try to pick up the odd freelance editing or proofreading work. Recently, for example, I finished copy editing a collection of a friend’s short stories; the manuscript has already been submitted to two publishers. (more…)