BoldFace

Home » technology

Category Archives: technology

Webinar: Effective technical editing

Technical editing is a special skill that requires editors to create documents such as procedures that are short and accurate while ensuring all safety considerations are included in their appropriate places. This is essential for any technical communications. This process will be demonstrated via the review and editing of a procedure on how to cook pasta that is currently too long, inconsistent, and terribly unsafe.

As a result of participating in this webinar, you will learn how to objectively observe and evaluate an existing procedure (document or video) using critical thinking skills. You will then learn how to edit and revise the text to create a new, accurate, and safe instructional procedure. This is particularly useful because it demonstrates how common practices are often extremely dangerous.

This webinar is geared to students or junior editors with basic experience in the topic area.

Presenter: Edward Fenner
Date: Wednesday, December 13
Time: 12 p.m., EST / 9 a.m., PST
Length: 1.5 hours
Language: English
Level: Introductory
Member price: $59.50
Non-member price: $85
Register HERE

Edward Fenner is a writer, editor, publisher, and consultant with over 30 years’ experience in corporate and academic settings.

Webinar: The WordPress A to Z webinar series

Knowing how to use WordPress is an empowering and essential business skill in today’s world of writing, editing, collaborating and publishing online content. This is a four-part webinar series that will teach you how to use WordPress, the world’s leading content management system and blogging platform. It’s ideal for writers, editors, and anyone who needs to have a website or blog.

The four webinars are:

  • WordPress at 10,000
  • Building Your Site: Beyond The Basics
  • All About Blogging
  • Plugins: The Apps That Make WP Useful

This series is foundational and practical and covers everything that you need to know—no matter what type of website you wish to make. By attending this webinar series, you will be able to create a WordPress site.

Taking this series entitles you to a free WordPress site to practise what you’ll be learning.

This webinar is geared to editorial and communication professionals who are at any stage of their career, but who have little to no knowledge of WordPress.

Presenter: Bud Kraus
Dates: Wednesday, December 6; Thursday, December 7; Monday, December 11; and Tuesday, December 12
Time: 12 p.m., EST / 9 a.m., PST
Length: Four 75-min. sessions
Language: English
Level: Introductory
Member price: $192.50
Non-member price: $275
Register HERE


Bud Kraus has been teaching WordPress online and in NYC classrooms for many years. His WordPress series has been presented over the past few years for the Editorial Freelancers Association. Follow him on Twitter.

Branch meeting: Multi-platform editing: Print, digital, audio, and video

As an editor, do you want to know more about cutting-edge developments in multimedia, including print-based storytelling combined with new work in 360-degree photography and Virtual Reality? Are you looking for ways to adapt your skills and experience to an increasingly multimedia publishing industry by learning how to think and edit across multiple platforms? Join us on November 28 for an exciting panel discussion led by four experienced editors whose work combines various aspects of print, digital, audio, and video content. Andrew Tolson (Rogers Media), Katie Underwood (Chatelaine), Anne-Marie Jackson (Toronto Star), and Jennifer Albert (Colborne Communications) will discuss their work on the digital and audiovisual side of formerly print-only publications, and address a wide range of issues related to industry-wide shifts from print to multimedia production.

New this month: fabulous prizes!

Editors Toronto raffle: $1 per ticket.
This month’s prizes: two copies of Michael Redhill’s 2017 Scotiabank Giller Prize–winning novel, Bellevue Square; two 2017 general admission passes to the Art Gallery of Ontario, and a smattering of office supplies.

Remember to pocket a loonie before you leave the house!

All raffle proceeds will be donated to a literacy charity selected by the Editors Toronto executive committee.

Editors Toronto would like to extend heartfelt thanks to its generous sponsors: the Scotiabank Giller Prize and the Art Gallery of Ontario. (more…)

Save your eyes! Tips to reduce computer-related eye strain

Monitor glare

By Michelle Waitzman

Working in front of a computer monitor all day, as most editors do, takes a toll on your eyes. Here are some tips on how to reduce the eye strain that can lead to fatigue, headaches, dry eyes, and loss of concentration.

Beware of Glare

Glare is caused by light reflecting off your monitor and into your eyes. It can come from your windows or from light fixtures and lamps. Glare makes it harder to read your documents, reduces contrast, and can reflect bright spots into your eyes causing you to squint. It’s best to reduce glare at the source, but if that isn’t possible you can purchase an anti-glare screen to attach to your monitor.

Glare from daylight can usually be fixed by moving your monitor to a better position. Your monitor should be perpendicular to the window in the room, so that the daylight hits it from the side. Placing your monitor in front of the window will cause the backlighting to be too strong, which makes your monitor appear dark. Placing your monitor across from the window will cause the most direct glare.

Even with the monitor angled correctly to the window, glare can be an issue when the sun is low in the sky. Curtains or blinds are the best way to control the amount of daylight entering the room. (more…)

Promoting accessibility in editorial businesses

Web Accessibility Source: Shutterstock

Source: Shutterstock

By Christine Albert

As a student enrolled in an editing program, I’m often asked to reflect on issues that may arise when working with clients. The discussion and module notes invariably focus on respect, clear communications, and diplomacy—about how the language of our queries and comments can affect authors. Yet, accessibility is rarely discussed, and few resources from professional associations or courses exist on how to make editorial businesses inclusive and accessible.

This lack of information on accessibility creates a disadvantage for those potential clients who may be physically or cognitively unable to use the same editing services as their peers. An author with multiple learning disabilities once explained to me that she found it difficult working with other editors: they simply wrote long comments using Track Changes, which she had difficulty reading. As a result, she had to constantly ask her transcriber to read her the edits and comments. After discussing the author’s needs, she and I worked out an alternate method that involved verbally communicating comments and large changes, which would let her work through the draft independently—a tactic that surprisingly hadn’t been considered by the other editors.

Lack of accessibility not only affects the services side of our businesses but it also affects our marketing efforts. Google searches for accessible and inclusive editing services turned up no relevant results. While searching editor websites, I was surprised to find that many do not follow the Web Content Accessibility Guidelines 2.0 (WCAG) nor incorporate basic accessibility features. For instance, a number of websites could not be zoomed in when viewed on a tablet, while others did not have enough contrast between the text and background. As someone with moderate vision issues, I struggled to read the content on these websites. Potential clients with visual or learning disabilities may be deterred by these difficulties and look elsewhere for an editor. If we are to operate our editorial businesses successfully, we need to go beyond our assumptions of what clients need and make our services accessible so we can provide them with what they actually require. (more…)