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Joining Editors Canada forged my path!

by Ann Kennedy

I joined Editors Canada as a student affiliate looking for opportunities to network with “real live” editors. I was partway through the Editing Certificate program at George Brown College and already thinking past graduation. Three years on, I don’t remember my exact Google search term, but I was thrilled to discover that the 2015 Editors Canada conference—their first international one, no less—was taking place in Toronto. I’m an old hand at conference planning, having worked at the local NXNE Music Festival and Conference for nine years, so I jumped at the chance.

I had no qualms about joining the organization in order to volunteer with it. I recognized the enormous potential for meeting people who could definitely advise me in my new career. And the Editors Canada website promised all manner of other benefits to members, too.

I’m so glad I did.

Volunteering at the registration desk was the ideal way to learn who was who in the editing world. I quickly found out that editors are an extraordinarily friendly and supportive group. My Facebook friend list doubled after the conference!

I went on to volunteer at the Editors Toronto booth at Word On The Street and join a national committee. The student relations committee represents the interests of students and fledgling editors in the association. Our mandate is to raise awareness of the association in editing and journalism programs and grow Editors Canada membership through attracting new student affiliates.

I was also honoured to be asked to join a task force whose goal is to improve access to member services for people who live in remote areas or who cannot access Editors Canada services for other reasons, such as disability.

All of this activity has paid off! I’ve made some great friends and I’ve done two copy editing contracts that were referred to me by members I’d met through volunteering. I highly recommend both joining Editors Canada and volunteering. The more you give of your time and talents, the more you’ll get!

Ann Kennedy is dedicated to reviving the skills and importance of excellent spelling, grammar, punctuation, and syntax in the digital age. She specializes in biography and memoir, travel literature and plain language.

This article was copy edited by Ambrose Li .

 

Reporting back on new directions in self-publishing: A summary of challenges, opportunities and resources

Editors Toronto paired with PWAC Toronto Chapter to present a panel on self-publishing. The following post is from the PWAC Toronto Chapter blog,  Networds. Thanks to editor Suzanne Bowness for giving BoldFace permission to share the post.

by Suzanne Bowness

PWAC Toronto chapter president Karen Luttrell introduces the panel

If you’re one of the unfortunate PWAC members who couldn’t make it to the self-publishing panel held on March 27, which was co-organized by PWAC Toronto Chapter and Editors Toronto, you’re in luck: I took notes for you. It’s not quite the same as being there, but here are a few tips and images to give you a flavour of the event.

If there were a quote to summarize the evening, perhaps it was one of the first to be projected on the big screen in the University of Toronto (U of T) lecture hall, where we all gathered:

“Self-publishing used to be a scar; now it’s a tattoo.”

That’s from Greg Cope White, author of The Pink Marine: One Boy’s Journey through Boot Camp to Manhood. I forgot to take a picture, but the quote still sticks in my mind days later.

Helpful slide of panellists’ names!

If the evening had a theme, it was how much has changed in the world of self-publishing, even in the last five years. Seriously, most panellists said those exact words or similar.

Hosted by the Creative Writing program at the School of Continuing Studies, U of T, the panel consisted of four industry pros, who all did a great job of dividing this big topic into digestible sections, providing a helpful mix of new information and personal anecdotes, which allowed their talks to flow together nicely. You can read the panellists’ biographies here, in our original post advertising the event. (more…)

Book review: What Next? by Dr. Barbara Moses

What Next?

by Karen Kemlo

Dr. Barbara Moses, known as “Canada’s career guru,” is a leading expert in work satisfaction and career success. This updated third edition of her best-selling book What Next? has something for anyone who is at a crossroads in their career or work life.

From millennials starting out in their job searches to more mature workers changing careers, this is a great step-by-step guide to making the next move. But be warned—it’s a big read with lots of homework in the form of self-assessment questions. Although likely meant to instill greater self-reflection, the detailed questions often bring the book and the reader to a full stop.

The early chapters discuss the notion of identifying one’s “core motivators” for seeking certain types of work. Based on her research, Moses has identified eight motivational types: sociability seekers, career builders, authenticity seekers, personal developers, novelty seekers, entrepreneurs, lifestylers, and stability seekers. The challenge, according to Moses, is “to find a work environment that provides the best possible match.”

It’s a unique approach to career guidance, something I wish I’d known about when starting out in the work world. Perhaps it would’ve focused my early job and education goals sooner. It might have also saved me the horror of dead-end and minimum-wage jobs. But I also know that my 20-year-old self would never have taken the time to fill out all of the questionnaires in this book.

Given the current job market, and the rise of part-time and precarious work, it seems unrealistic to assume that all workers will always have the ability to choose. Sometimes you have to take jobs and work with difficult people, simply in order to pay the bills. Life challenges, such as downsizing, divorce or illness get in the way of career goals.

What Next? is still a great resource for people at different stages in their careers and touches on some of the issues that everyone has to deal with at some point: how to overcome job burnout, how to deal with difficult bosses, what to do if you’re fired, how to write a resumé, and the benefits of networking. These chapters are shorter and less detailed than the ones on self-assessment and motivational types. As a consequence, the author—and the reader—spend more time inside the world of ideas and ideal jobs than in the real world of work.

Karen Kemlo is a freelance editor and writer in Toronto. 

This article was copy edited by Ellen Fleischer

Thank you to our volunteers!

Editors Toronto is part of a national professional association run by and for its members. Everything you see, read, and attend is organized and co-ordinated by volunteers. As editor-in-chief of BoldFace, I want to acknowledge all the volunteers who have contributed their skills, time, and talent to helping me make this blog an interesting, informative, fun place for readers. And thanks to everyone who helped at events and brought their expertise to bear. The executive committee and I thank you for making 2017 such a great year, and we look forward to working with all of you again in 2018!

BoldFace copy editors and writers

Christine Albert (copy editing, writing)
Joe Cotterchio-Milligan (copy editing)
Ellen Fleischer (copy editing)
Jennifer D. Foster (writing)
James Harbeck (writing)
Deepi Harish (writing)
Emma Warnken Johnson (writing)
Karen Kemlo (copy editing)
Afara Kimkeran (copy editing)
Ambrose Li (copy editing)
Shara Love (writing)
Jaye Marsh (copy editing, writing)
Tom Nicholls (copy editing)
Nicole North (copy editing)
Jeny Nussey (copy editing)
Berna Ozunal (writing)
Olga Sushinsky (copy editing)
Alethea Spiridon (writing)
Rachel Stuckey (writing)
Ana Trask (copy editing)
Jessica Trudel (writing)
Michelle Waitzman (writing)
Avivah Wargon (writing)
Vanessa Wells (copy editing)

BoldFace editors for life

Stephanie Fysh
Patrick Geraghty
Greg Ioannou
Marnie Lamb
Jeanne McKane
Wilf Popoff
Sara Scharf
Sally Sparrow
Suzanne Sutherland
Heather J. Wood

Branch meeting helpers

Nadia Aftab
Mel Bender
Marina Demetriou
Adrineh Der-Boghossian
Sue Gargiulo
Aquin George
Raya P. Morrison
Danielle Putinja
Erika Westman
Michelle Waitzman

Branch-meetings panellists

Jennifer Albert (non-member)
Carolyn Camilleri
Donovan Dill (non-member)
Jennifer D. Foster
Jayne S. Huhtanen (non-member)
Anne-Marie Jackson (non-member)
Marnie Lamb
Jeanne McKane
Nicole Roccas
Andrew Tolson (non-member)
Katie Underwood (non-member)

The Word On The Street helpers

Ruth Chernia
Catherine Dorton
Kerry Fast
Jennifer D. Foster
Ellen Keeble
Bob Kennedy
Deven Knill
Robin Marwick

Report on ACES 2017 in St. Petersburg, Florida

By Berna Ozunal

This year, 591 people travelled to St. Petersburg, Florida, for the annual American Copy Editors Society (ACES) conference held from March 23 to 25 at the Hilton St. Petersburg Bayfront Hotel—the second-highest attendance ever.

I went to St. Pete’s for a few reasons this year: I enjoyed last year’s conference in Portland and learned a lot, I seriously needed to “defrost,” and I was presenting a session.

Located on Florida’s Gulf Coast, St. Petersburg has a population of just over 250,000. From the Tampa International Airport, it’s just a 30-minute taxi or shuttle ride to the hotel.

I was told that March is the perfect time to travel to Florida, and it’s true. With highs between 24ºC and 28ºC, you are transported to another dimension—one where people do not walk around half the year swaddled like mummies in wool and down. (more…)

Editors Storytelling Night

"The Storyteller," by Giovanni Domenico Tiepolo (c. mid-1770s) Public domain, via Wikimedia Commons

“The Storyteller,” by Giovanni Domenico Tiepolo (c. mid-1770s) Public domain, via Wikimedia Commons

If you joined Editors Canada with hopes of meeting other editors, this is the program for you. Join us Wednesday, February 22, 2017, to commiserate with your fellow editors, learn from them, share a funny story, and hear others’ stories from the editorial trenches.

Program details

Miles Nadal Jewish Community Centre, 750 Spadina Ave., Room R202. The building is fully accessible, and coffee will be served at 7 pm.

7 PM Mingling and informal Q & A session for new and prospective members
7:30 PM Announcements and business meeting
8:00 PM Program
9 PM Mix and mingle

Getting to know you

Speed Networking

By Ghozt Tramp via Wikimedia Commons

By Michelle Waitzman

The new year started with a bang for the Toronto branch’s monthly program. The first event of 2017 dispensed with the usual presenter–audience format and devoted the evening to speed networking.

Nearly 20 participants paired off to get acquainted for seven to eight minutes at a time. Icebreaker questions were provided for anyone who was uncomfortable striking up a conversation out of the blue. At the end of each session, everyone found a new partner and began again. This cycle repeated six times, and participants were then invited to stick around to continue their conversations after the official networking ended. I spoke to some of the participants at the beginning of the evening about what they were hoping to get out of the session.

For University of Toronto student Rosie, the event was an opportunity to explore editing as a career option. She is not yet an Editors Canada member, but she has been doing some editing work for her fellow students and may want to continue editing after graduation.

Adrineh recently joined Editors Canada on the recommendation of one of her editing instructors at Ryerson. Adrineh currently works in corporate communications and she’s taking courses to hone her editing skills. She wanted to meet people who had made the leap to full-time careers in editing. (more…)

Webinar: How to meet people in a room full of strangers

Date: Wednesday, February 1
Time: 2 p.m., EST / 11 a.m., PST
Length: 1 hour
Language: English
Member price: $37.50
Non-Member price: $50
Register now

Description
Have you heard the sage advice to attend networking events to showcase your company, build your list and find new clients to grow your business? But…You often end up standing around on the sidelines finding it hard to start the conversation when you’re faced with a room full of strangers.
If you get nervous and stumble all over your words when trying to meet people, you’re in the right place!

In this 60-minute webinar you’ll learn how to break through the roadblocks with

  • two ways to start the conversation FAST, right at the front door before you even get into the room,
  • two ways to KEEP the conversation going after “Hello, my name is…”
  • three surefire techniques to easily START the conversation if you find yourself in the room alone without a conversation partner,
  • how to AVOID the #1 name tag mistake that 80 percent of people make,
  • how to put an END to the business card fumble when exchanging cards, and
  • the #1 tip people always ask me: how to gracefully LEAVE a conversation (Hint: It’s not what most people will tell you).

The key concepts of this webinar are that you don’t have time to waste, you’ll need a system to follow, and I’ll share my tried-and-true methods and skill-building exercises with you. Being prepared with a plan and practicing beforehand can reduce or even eliminate fear.

Instructor

Cheryl Scoffield 

Cheryl Scoffield, the follow-up specialist, helps business professionals package their expertise to create follow-up which builds trust and maximizes the sales potential buried in their prospective list without feeling like a pest!
Twitter: @CherylScoffield