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Editor for Life: JF Garrard, Deputy Editor for Ricepaper Magazine

Interview conducted by Jennifer D. Foster.

A career as an editor is often a solo adventure, especially if you’re a freelancer. So we thought one way to better connect with fellow editors was to ask them the W5: who, what, where, when, and why. Read on for some thought-provoking, enlightening tidbits from those of us who choose to work with words to earn our keep.

Please tell us a little about yourself, the kind of work you do (and where you live), and how long you’ve been an editor.

I’m a publisher and writer of speculative fiction, based in Toronto. I fell into editing in 2014 when Derwin Mak (fellow writer/editor) told me that an Asian-Canadian magazine called Ricepaper Magazine wanted to create a speculative fiction issue but didn’t have enough people to do it. I volunteered to help, and we edited an issue together in record time! In 2017, I was recruited by Ricepaper to help with writing film reviews, marketing, and coordinating events. In 2018, my role progressed to editorial and administrative work. My tasks now involve editing, interviewing potential editors, networking, coordinating events, and leading the production work for books and magazines. In parallel timelines, for my own press, Dark Helix Press, I began working on different anthology projects with editorial teams. Over time, I’ve learned a lot from leading projects and working with many diverse editors on magazine and book production. At the moment, I’m also in the middle of finishing up courses for a creative writing certificate from Ryerson University.

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Editing Worlds: Speculative Fiction and the Editorial Process

When: Tuesday, February 26, 7–9:30 PM (Please note the earlier start time, to accommodate our business meeting.)

Where: Centre for Social Innovation (CSI) Spadina, 192 Spadina Ave., Third Floor, Room F

Robert A. Heinlein first used the term “speculative fiction” in 1947 to describe the highest aspiration of science fiction. Over time, the term has expanded to include other genres, including fantasy and horror, as well as derivatives and hybrids. As an umbrella genre in which worlds are often built from scratch rather than patterned after our own, speculative fiction has provided fertile ground for social and political critique. It has also evolved to support a diversity of voices, though expanding the representational repertoire of speculative fiction remains a concern.

Join Editors Toronto on February 26 to hear four seasoned writers and editors discuss their experiences with the genre. Toronto’s Jen Frankel, JF Garrard, Dominik Parisien, and Drew Hayden Taylor will talk about various topics, including

  • the expanding role of Indigenous Voice in genre fiction (Drew Hayden Taylor);
  • the pressures of representation within texts and in relation to the broader publishing industry (Dominik Parisien);
  • the realities of indie publishing, crowdfunding, editing, and world building (Jen Frankel and JF Garrard);
  • the lessons learned from panels on writing and pop culture about the need for diverse stories in literature, film, and media (Jen Frankel and JF Garrard); and
  • strategies for supporting authors of different backgrounds and identities while keeping their voices intact throughout the editing process (Jen Frankel).

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Editors Unplugged: Get to know our panellists for Editing Worlds: Speculative Fiction and the Editorial Process

Interviews conducted by Catherine Dorton.

More details on the program forthcoming.

Our popular monthly program meetings often feature a jam-packed agenda. We like to keep our introductions short, so you can hear more from our panellists and less from us! It’s hard to do justice to the incredible wealth of experience these guests bring to the table, so we are offering you a preview with this short Q&A beforehand.

This month, we are honoured to be joined by Jen Frankel, JF Garrard, Dominik Parisien, and Drew Hayden Taylor.

Photo of Jen FrankelJen Frankel

If you could co-write a piece of speculative fiction with a famous author of any genre, who would you pick?

Definitely Anne McCaffrey. As long as I’m allowed to go back in time to do it. If I’m limited to now, Val McDermid. I’d drag her to the dark side and make her consider some supernatural interjections.

Star Wars, Star Trek, or Doctor Who? 

Marry: Star Trek. Date: Star Wars. Kill: Doctor Who. I really want to love the Doctor, but ever since the reboot, I feel like I’m in a downward spiral toward despair. But I haven’t watched the new season…

Who is your favourite monster? 

My favourite monster is Lilith, mother of all monsters and I’m absolutely sure totally maligned!

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Let’s Talk Rates! How to Ask for What You’re Worth and Get Paid on Time

Learn about setting rates (and raising them) from long-time freelancers at the PWAC Toronto February seminar. Note, Editors Toronto members are eligible to receive the PWAC Partners discount.

PWAC Feb 25 seminar Let's Talk Rates

Date: Monday, February 25, 2019
Time: 7:15 p.m. to 8:45 p.m. (doors open at 7 p.m.)
Location: Miles Nadal JCC, Room 318 (third floor)

Why is talking about freelance pay rates and money in general so challenging? In this seminar, we ask long-time freelancers to share advice on how they’ve set their rates and how they’ve raised them over the years.

Speakers:

  • Carol J. Anderson, an editor, proofreader, researcher, and writer for the private sector, non-profits, and government
  • Allan Britnell, freelance writer and editor and past-president of the Canadian Society of Magazine Editors
  • Diane Peters, a writer and editor who has covered a variety of topics for national publications and also teaches writing at Ryerson University
  • Suzanne (Sue) Bowness (seminar moderator), a long-time freelance writer/editor and writing teacher

To learn more about the seminar and the speakers, visit pwactoronto.org.

As always, PWAC Toronto evening seminars are FREE for PWAC members, and while non-members who register online in advance receive a discount.

The organizers ask that you please register in advance so they know how many people to expect.

REGISTER FOR THE SEMINAR

Recommended reading: Sue Bowness shares a preview of our seminar topic in her latest Networds Blog post.

Did you know? Editors Toronto offers in-house seminars

Editors Toronto in-house seminars postcard cover

Does your organization need help with editing and communication?

Editors Toronto offers specialized professional development training through our in-house seminars. Offered year-round, our seminars are taught by in-demand editorial professionals, curated and organized exclusively for your team!

Seminar topics offered include Plain Language, Copy Editing, Proofreading, Grammar and Punctuation, and many more.

Interested? Contact the Editors Toronto seminars chair today for more information about our group rates and customized training for your workplace:

[email protected]

“This seminar exceeded our expectations. The team felt that it was a fantastic refresh…it was very helpful!” —Toronto International Festival of Authors

Editor for Life: Allegra Robinson, freelance editor

Interview conducted by Indu Singh.

A career as an editor is often a solo adventure, especially if you’re a freelancer. So we thought one way to better connect with fellow editors was to ask them the W5: who, what, where, when, and why. Read on for some thought-provoking, enlightening tidbits from those of us who choose to work with words to earn our keep.

Portrait of Allegra Robinson

Allegra, please tell us a little about yourself, the kind of work you do (and where you live), and how long you’ve been an editor.

I still consider myself lucky. Although I had no publishing experience yet, in 2004 I was offered a temporary job filling in for a production editor [at Pearson]. I went on to become a production editor at Pearson and later at HarperCollins Canada. My in-house stints alternated with periods of freelancing, and I’ve been in one of those periods now for four years. I moved to Toronto in 1983 to study fashion design at Ryerson. I lasted one year in that program (it was extremely demanding, and I was extremely unsuited to it).

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Editors Canada launches Guidelines for Ethical Editing of Student Texts

In academia, papers and theses are one way to test the ability of students to use written words for communicating ideas and arguments. Yet students sometimes ask editors to provide a full gamut of editorial services.

To address this, Editors Canada first developed Guidelines for Ethical Editing of Theses / Dissertations in 2005. We are pleased to announce the association has updated these free guidelines for ethical editing of papers at the graduate and doctoral level. We have also added a second set of free guidelines to cover undergraduate papers.

For more information, read the news release here.

Editors Unplugged: Get to know our panellists for Winning Two Gillers: A Conversation with Esi Edugyan and Her Editors

Interviews conducted by Catherine Dorton.

Our popular monthly program meetings often feature a jam-packed agenda. We like to keep our introductions short, so you can hear more from our panellists and less from us! It’s hard to do justice to the incredible wealth of experience these guests bring to the table, so we are offering you a preview with this short Q&A beforehand.

This month, we are honoured to be joined by not only acclaimed novelist Esi Edugyan, but also four (!) of her editors: Patrick Crean, John Sweet, Jane Warren, and Marie-Lynn Hammond.

Patrick CreanPatrick Crean

If you could travel to any fictional world, where would you go?

If you mean an entirely made-up place in fiction, then I would love to visit Alice in Wonderland! Oddly enough, I wouldn’t mind visiting Orwell’s 1984 (Orwell is an all-time fave of mine) as long as I didn’t get stuck there…. But if you mean real settings in fiction, I would want to visit the Alexandria in Lawrence Durrell’s Alexandria Quartet and/or the Morocco of Paul Bowles’s novel The Sheltering Sky.

What’s your favourite way of procrastinating? And how do you get back to work?

Procrastinating? I can’t say I do a lot of that, but if I am having a tough start to an editing day, I’ll make another pot of coffee and clean up the kitchen before heading back to my manuscripts. A good way to reboot for me is to power walk five km around the Central Tech track near our house! Or I might do an aural tune-up by reading something by Chekhov or W.H. Auden or Elizabeth Bishop or J.D. Salinger or James Salter.

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