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Winning Two Gillers: A Conversation with Esi Edugyan and Her Editors

When: Tuesday, January 22, 7–9 pm

Where: University of Toronto, Sidney Smith Hall (amphitheatre), 100 St. George St., (Room 2102) 

Co-presented by Editors Toronto, Canadian Authors–Toronto, and the Creative Writing Program at the School of Continuing Studies (SCS), University of Toronto

This special event will bring acclaimed novelist Esi Edugyan together with four of her editors — Patrick CreanMarie-Lynn Hammond, John Sweet, and Jane Warren — for a discussion about the writing and editing of Ms. Edugyan’s two Giller Prize–winning novels, Half-Blood Blues (2011) and Washington Black (2018).

Have you wondered what it’s like, editorially speaking, to work with an author who has won not one but two Giller Prizes? Would you like to know more about the author-editor relationship on these celebrated books? Esi Edugyan and her panel of accomplished editors will address issues such as these during their talks and the Q&A.

We’ll hear from editors Patrick Crean, Marie-Lynn Hammond, and Jane Warren about the scrambling that ensued when Key Porter Books, the original publisher for Half-Blood Blues, closed down during the edit. And we’ll find out why Montreal editor John Sweet is still talking about the amazing experience he had copy editing Washington Black for HarperCollins imprint Patrick Crean Editions.

 This event will feature a reading and a brief talk about the author-editor relationship by Ms. Edugyan and short presentations from her editors, followed by a Q&A. We’ll close the event with a raffle, and time will be allowed for Ms. Edugyan to sign books.

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Thank you to our volunteers!

Red card with the words "thank you" on it next to a fountain pen.

Photo by Aaron Burden on Unsplash

Editors Toronto is part of a national professional association run by and for its members. Everything you see, read, and attend is organized and coordinated by volunteers.

We have had over 30 unique volunteers this season, many of them volunteering on more than one occasion. Volunteers are vital to the success of Editors Toronto. Everything we do is possible because of our volunteers. Thank you for your time, your positive attitude, and your willingness to serve this branch. This is truly a team effort.

The Editors Toronto’s executive would like to thank you for making 2018 such a great year, and we look forward to working with all of you again in 2019!

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Professional Editorial Standards in Action

Professional Editorial StandardsWhen: Tuesday, November 27, 2018, 7–9 PM (Please note the earlier start time, to accommodate our rescheduled business meeting.)

Where: Centre for Social Innovation (CSI) Spadina, 192 Spadina Ave., Third Floor, Room F

(Note: CSI Spadina moved across the street, to 192 Spadina Ave., as of late September 2018.)

Have you ever wondered whether your work as an editor meets the criteria set out in Editors Canada’s 2016 Professional Editorial Standards (PES) document? Have you read the standards but been left with questions about how to apply them to your own editing, or not read them and wondered what you might be missing?

Whether you’re familiar with the document or not, are new to the field or have been editing for years, or work in-house or freelance, our November program will help you gain a better understanding of the updated professional standards that were adopted by Editors Canada on October 1, 2016, and implemented on January 1, 2017. This meeting brings together four experienced editors for a panel that’s designed to take the mystery out of the standards by exploring how they work in practice.

Drawing insight and examples from their own backgrounds as practicing editors and members of various standards committees, Elizabeth d’Anjou, Amy Brown, Jennifer Dinsmore, and Laura Edlund will explore the four stages of editing covered by PES: structural editing, stylistic editing, copy editing, and proofreading. They will discuss the type of knowledge and practices that are required of all professional editors and the skills needed at each stage of editing. They will also talk about how they have applied the standards in their own work as in-house and freelance editors of Indigenous literature, fantasy and speculative fiction, educational texts, government documents, and more.

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Indigenous editing principles, featuring Gregory Younging and his new style guide, Elements of Indigenous Style

Elements of Indigenous Style by Gregory Younging book coverWhen: NEW TIME: Tuesday, October 23, 2018, 6:30–8 PM

Where: NEW LOCATION: Centre for Social Innovation (CSI) Spadina, 192 Spadina Ave., Third Floor, Room F

(CSI Spadina moved across the street, to 192 Spadina Ave., as of late September.)

For the second program meeting of 2018–19, we are excited to feature Dr. Gregory Younging, author of the new and indispensable style guide, Elements of Indigenous Style (Brush Education, 2018).

Gregory’s exciting study—move over Strunk and White—is the first comprehensive style guide on Indigenous writing. It comprises 22 editorial principles or guidelines and explains why each one is needed. The first principle stresses, in part, that Indigenous Peoples must prioritize their self-perceptions and epistemologies. And the last, on the seemingly straightforward matter of verb tense, probes the nuts and bolts of how to write responsibly about Indigenous Peoples past and present. The other 20 supply much needed advice on ensuring appropriate and respectful interaction with Indigenous cultural materials and their custodians.

In introducing his new book, Gregory has recently delivered talks and conducted workshops across Canada. Now, happily, it’s Toronto’s turn! Please join us for what will surely be an enlightening discussion of Indigenous style—a subject of vital relevance for writers, editors, and publishers today.

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Editorial Two-Step: The author-editor relationship

When: Tuesday, September 25, 7–9 PM

NEW, TEMPORARY LOCATION: CSI Regent Park, 585 Dundas St. East, Room 1

Welcome back to Editors Toronto, and a special welcome to any new or returning members.

Editors Canada turns 40 this year, and we are thrilled to mark this big round number with another season of programming designed to inspire and keep us all learning and growing together as editors of the written word.

For the first program of 2018–19, we bring you two fascinating case studies on the editorial process and the editorial relationship.

Toronto author Trevor Cole and his editor Jennifer Lambert of HarperCollins Canada will discuss their work on Cole’s award-winning non-fiction book The Whisky King (2017), while Toronto author Robert Marrone and his editor Michael Mirolla of Guernica Editions will explore Marrone’s 2017 novel, The New Vine.

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Reporting back on new directions in self-publishing: A summary of challenges, opportunities and resources

Editors Toronto paired with PWAC Toronto Chapter to present a panel on self-publishing. The following post is from the PWAC Toronto Chapter blog,  Networds. Thanks to editor Suzanne Bowness for giving BoldFace permission to share the post.

by Suzanne Bowness

PWAC Toronto chapter president Karen Luttrell introduces the panel

If you’re one of the unfortunate PWAC members who couldn’t make it to the self-publishing panel held on March 27, which was co-organized by PWAC Toronto Chapter and Editors Toronto, you’re in luck: I took notes for you. It’s not quite the same as being there, but here are a few tips and images to give you a flavour of the event.

If there were a quote to summarize the evening, perhaps it was one of the first to be projected on the big screen in the University of Toronto (U of T) lecture hall, where we all gathered:

“Self-publishing used to be a scar; now it’s a tattoo.”

That’s from Greg Cope White, author of The Pink Marine: One Boy’s Journey through Boot Camp to Manhood. I forgot to take a picture, but the quote still sticks in my mind days later.

Helpful slide of panellists’ names!

If the evening had a theme, it was how much has changed in the world of self-publishing, even in the last five years. Seriously, most panellists said those exact words or similar.

Hosted by the Creative Writing program at the School of Continuing Studies, U of T, the panel consisted of four industry pros, who all did a great job of dividing this big topic into digestible sections, providing a helpful mix of new information and personal anecdotes, which allowed their talks to flow together nicely. You can read the panellists’ biographies here, in our original post advertising the event. (more…)

Thank you to our volunteers!

Editors Toronto is part of a national professional association run by and for its members. Everything you see, read, and attend is organized and co-ordinated by volunteers. As editor-in-chief of BoldFace, I want to acknowledge all the volunteers who have contributed their skills, time, and talent to helping me make this blog an interesting, informative, fun place for readers. And thanks to everyone who helped at events and brought their expertise to bear. The executive committee and I thank you for making 2017 such a great year, and we look forward to working with all of you again in 2018!

BoldFace copy editors and writers

Christine Albert (copy editing, writing)
Joe Cotterchio-Milligan (copy editing)
Ellen Fleischer (copy editing)
Jennifer D. Foster (writing)
James Harbeck (writing)
Deepi Harish (writing)
Emma Warnken Johnson (writing)
Karen Kemlo (copy editing)
Afara Kimkeran (copy editing)
Ambrose Li (copy editing)
Shara Love (writing)
Jaye Marsh (copy editing, writing)
Tom Nicholls (copy editing)
Nicole North (copy editing)
Jeny Nussey (copy editing)
Berna Ozunal (writing)
Olga Sushinsky (copy editing)
Alethea Spiridon (writing)
Rachel Stuckey (writing)
Ana Trask (copy editing)
Jessica Trudel (writing)
Michelle Waitzman (writing)
Avivah Wargon (writing)
Vanessa Wells (copy editing)

BoldFace editors for life

Stephanie Fysh
Patrick Geraghty
Greg Ioannou
Marnie Lamb
Jeanne McKane
Wilf Popoff
Sara Scharf
Sally Sparrow
Suzanne Sutherland
Heather J. Wood

Branch meeting helpers

Nadia Aftab
Mel Bender
Marina Demetriou
Adrineh Der-Boghossian
Sue Gargiulo
Aquin George
Raya P. Morrison
Danielle Putinja
Erika Westman
Michelle Waitzman

Branch-meetings panellists

Jennifer Albert (non-member)
Carolyn Camilleri
Donovan Dill (non-member)
Jennifer D. Foster
Jayne S. Huhtanen (non-member)
Anne-Marie Jackson (non-member)
Marnie Lamb
Jeanne McKane
Nicole Roccas
Andrew Tolson (non-member)
Katie Underwood (non-member)

The Word On The Street helpers

Ruth Chernia
Catherine Dorton
Kerry Fast
Jennifer D. Foster
Ellen Keeble
Bob Kennedy
Deven Knill
Robin Marwick

Taming time

Lion tamer

A lion tamer at Bertram Mills Touring Circus, Ascot/Edward G Malindine/
Collection of National Media Museum/ CREATIVE COMMONS ATTRIBUTION-NONCOMMERCIAL-SHAREALIKE (CC BY-NC-SA 4.0)

By Jaye Marsh

Time management was a popular topic to start off the year for Editors Toronto branch meetings.

A full house of approximately 40 people greeted the guest panellists at our new venue. Thanks to Greg Ioannou, lifetime member of Editors Canada, the Toronto branch now meets at the Centre for Social Innovation, a lovely multimedia-capable space on Spadina Avenue near Queen Street West.

The evening’s program, held on September 26, was about “Time-management for busy editors.” Program chair Lee Parpart invited four panellists: Jennifer D. Foster, Jeanne McKane, Dr. Nicole Lyon Roccas, and Jayne S. Huhtanen.

Jennifer gave us a list of practical tips and guiding principles that work for her: knowing your needs, discipline, attitude, and creating the right space in which to work. She reviewed her unsuccessful experience with the Pomodoro technique (setting tasks and using timers); making lists; using a hard-copy calendar; the importance of checklists to relieve the memory banks; taking regular breaks; exercising; setting rewards; and learning to say no. At the end, Jennifer stressed the importance of surrounding herself with positive, kind people who are supportive and respectful of her and her work. The end result? A favourable effect on productivity, motivation, and efficiency. (more…)