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The Nitpicker’s Nook: July’s linguistic links roundup

The Nitpicker’s Nook is a monthly collection of language-related articles, interviews, and blog posts from around the Web. If you read something that would make a good addition, email your suggestion to [email protected].

By Robin MarwickThe Nitpicker's Nook

  • Too much work, too little focus? Cartoonist Katie McKissick found herself battling burnout and came up with some novel ways to beat it. (Symbiartic)
  • Editing Goes Global is long over, but that doesn’t mean you can’t still learn from it. The organizers have collected all the recaps they could find and put them on one page. Don’t miss the link to the session handouts! (Editors Canada)
  • If you’re like most editors, you want to do your absolute best with every project that comes your way, but that’s sometimes easier said than done. Rich Adin discusses some keys to high-quality editing, starting with the decision whether to accept a project or not. (An American Editor)
  • Freelance editing has its joys and its crises: for starters, no work, too much work, or finding out you’ve made a catastrophic error. Liz Dexter discusses what to do in six common freelance crisis situations, including how to prevent them from happening again. (LibroEditing.com)
  • Speaking of errors, yes, even editors make them. Arlene Prunkl looks at when to freak out, when to let an error go, and when to be a little kinder to ourselves and others (hint: all the time). (Penultimate Word)
  • Testimonials from satisfied clients are a persuasive marketing tool. Adrienne Montgomerie suggests easy, effective ways to get them and explains what to do with testimonials when you have them. (Copyediting.com)
  • Some writing rules are made to be broken, especially in fiction. Here are 20. (Emma Darwin)

Robin Marwick is a Toronto-based freelance editor, medical writer, content strategist, and dog lover.

This article was copy edited by Valerie Borden.


1 Comment

  1. Thanks for the shoutout, Robin! Much appreciated.

    Like

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