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Editorial Two-Step: The Author-Editor Relationship

When: Tuesday, September 25, 7–9 PM

NEW, TEMPORARY LOCATION: CSI Regent Park, 585 Dundas St. East, Room 1

Welcome back to Editors Toronto, and a special welcome to any new or returning members.

Editors Canada turns 40 this year, and we are thrilled to mark this big round number with another season of programming designed to inspire and keep us all learning and growing together as editors of the written word.

For the first program of 2018–19, we bring you two fascinating case studies on the editorial process and the editorial relationship.

Toronto author Trevor Cole and his editor Jennifer Lambert of HarperCollins Canada will discuss their work on Cole’s award-winning non-fiction book The Whisky King (2017), while Toronto author Robert Marrone and his editor Michael Mirolla of Guernica Editions will explore Marrone’s 2017 novel, The New Vine.

The Whisky King chronicles the cat-and-mouse game between infamous Italian-Canadian bootlegger Rocco Perri and the Italian-Canadian Mountie Frank Zaneth, who devoted his career to putting Perri behind bars.

Marrone’s debut novel, The New Vine, explores the complex relationship between characters whose lives take them from WWII-era Italy to Canada.

Both writer-editor pairs will discuss the editorial process and relationship as factors shaping their books, with examples drawn from their manuscripts. Q&A to follow.

More about our speakers:

Trevor Cole

Trevor Cole is an award-winning journalist and novelist. His novels include Norman Bray in the Performance of His Life and The Fearsome Particles, both short-listed for the Governor General’s Literary Award. His novel Practical Jean was short-listed for the Rogers Writers’ Trust Fiction Prize and won the Leacock Medal for Humour. Trevor’s latest book is The Whisky King, an epic non-fiction historical narrative, nominated for the Speaker’s Book Award and the Heritage Toronto Award and winner of the 2018 Arthur Ellis Award for Canada’s best non-fiction crime book. Trevor lives in Toronto. Find out more here.

Jennifer Lambert

Jennifer Lambert is an editorial director at HarperCollins Canada. Acclaimed and bestselling authors she has worked with include Emily St. John Mandel, Heather O’Neill, Claudia Dey, Trevor Cole, Uzma Jalaluddin, Charlotte Gray, Michael Harris, Ayelet Tsabari, and Prime Minister Justin Trudeau. Her authors have been awarded and short-listed for the Scotiabank Giller Prize, the Governor General’s Literary Awards for fiction and non-fiction, the National Book Award, the RBC Taylor Prize, the Women’s Prize for Fiction, Arthur Ellis crime-writing awards, and more. Jennifer is former chair of the Writers’ Trust of Canada and current chair of the Humber Creative Book Publishing Program Publishers’ Advisory Committee.

Robert Marrone

Toronto’s Robert Marrone holds a degree in philosophy and literature, with subsequent graduate courses in writing and editing. He is a frequent contributor to Canadian Rail Magazine. He currently works as a project manager and freelance technical writer. The New Vine marks his debut as a novelist and is the first installment in a planned trilogy.

Michael Mirolla

Michael Mirolla is a novelist, poet, short-story writer, and editor whose writing combines elements of magic realism, surrealism, speculative fiction, and meta-fiction. His publications include three Bressani Prize winners: Berlin; The House on 14th Avenue; and Lessons in Relationship Dyads. Other publications include a punk-inspired novella; a ménage-a-trois mystery set in Vancouver during the War Measures Act; and the magic realist short story collection The Photographer in Search of Death. With partner Connie McParland, Michael runs Guernica Editions, a literary press that publishes poetry, fiction, and literary non-fiction. Born in Italy and raised in Montreal, Michael now lives in Oakville, Ontario. Find out more here.


ENTER OUR RAFFLE!
All proceeds will go toward our programs budget to help pay our speakers and provide cutting-edge programming for our members.

Cost: $2/ticket, $5 for three tickets, or $10 for seven tickets.

Prizes: one $50 gift certificate to any Oxford Properties Group shopping centre (includes the Scarborough Town Centre); one copy of Robert Marrone’s novel The New Vine; and a one-hour mentoring session with Editors Toronto co-chair Jennifer Foster.

Editors Toronto would like to thank the Oxford Properties Group, Guernica Editions, and Jennifer Foster for generously supporting this event with their donations.

Program details for Tuesday, September 25, 7 PM

NEW TEMPORARY LOCATION: Centre for Social Innovation (CSI) Regent Park location, 585 Dundas St. East, Toronto, Room 1.

7 PM Mingling and informal Q&A for new and prospective members
7:30 PM Branch meeting
7:45 PM Program
9 PM Mix-and-mingle

Free for members; $10 for non-members.

Directions, parking, and accessibility information here.

Trouble getting into the building? Text the programs chair at 647-607-0416, and we will send someone to open the door.

ABOUT OUR NEW LOCATION: Due to the fact that CSI Spadina is moving into a new building this fall, our September 25 program meeting will be held at the CSI Regent Park (585 Dundas St. East, Room 1). This is a temporary move. Stay tuned for details about our planned move into the new CSI Spadina location (at 192 Spadina Ave.) later this fall.

Thank you to our volunteers in 2017–18!

Editors Toronto is part of a national professional association run by and for its members. Everything you see, read, and attend is organized and co-ordinated by volunteers.

During the 2017–18 season we had over 60 unique volunteers, many of them volunteering on more than one occasion. Volunteers are vital to the success of Editors Toronto. Everything we do is possible because of our volunteers. Thank you for your time, your positive attitude, and your willingness to serve this branch. This is truly a team effort.

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Book Review: The Art of Stopping Time: Practical Mindfulness for Busy People by Pedram Shojai

Art of Stopping Time

By Emma Warnken Johnson

Mindfulness is everywhere these days. There seems to be an endless supply of books, articles, and apps touting its benefits. The practices vary, but they all seek to focus the mind on the present moment, shedding distractions and helping us appreciate the little things in our lives. I’ve been meaning to try mindfulness for quite some time, but never seem to be able to fit it into my busy schedule.

This makes The Art of Stopping Time: Practical Mindfulness for Busy People a timely book for me, and I suspect it will be for a lot of other busy editors too. Taoist monk and Qi Gong master Pedram Shojai adapts the 100-day Gong—a traditional Taoist practice—to create a mindfulness routine that can fit into a busy schedule. The book is divided into 100 short chapters, and each one describes a brief daily activity that promotes mindfulness and a healthier relationship to the way we think about and spend our time.

The activities vary widely. Readers are asked to do some breathing exercises, to stretch and relax their muscles, and to eat a meal without the distraction of other activities (like watching TV). Some days include simple activities designed to give your mind a short break, like going for a walk, taking a bath, or making a cup of tea—and several of these seem tailor-made for an editor who takes regular breaks to improve productivity. Other days are more reflective, asking you to think about how you spend their time and review your priorities. Reading through the activities, I found several that I thought I would enjoy and could easily integrate into my daily schedule. (more…)

An evening with Michael Redhill and Martha Kanya-Forstner

by Joanne Haskins

Editors Toronto hosted a special branch meeting in January, when acclaimed author Michael Redhill took the stage with his editor, Martha Kanya-Forstner, to discuss the writing and editing of Bellevue Square, the 2017 Scotiabank Giller Prize winner.

Redhill’s novels include Consolation (longlisted for the Man Booker Prize) and Martin Sloane (a finalist for the Giller Prize). He has written a novel for young adults, four collections of poetry and two plays. Redhill also writes a series of crime novels under the name Inger Ash Wolfe and is an editor and Editors Canada member. Kanya-Forstner is editor-in-chief for both Doubleday Canada and McClelland & Stewart. Along with Redhill’s prizewinner, she’s edited David Chariandy’s novel Brother, which won the Rogers Writers’ Trust Fiction Prize, and James Maskalyk’s Life on the Ground Floor, winner of the Hilary Weston Writers’ Trust Prize for Nonfiction.
There were few empty seats and the audience of writers, writing students and editors anticipated an enlightening discussion as two of the most highly regarded figures in Canadian literature today promised to reveal the ins and outs of the editor-writer working relationship. The biggest takeaway of the evening for editors was “Ask questions.”

 

After introductions of both Redhill and Kanya-Forstner, each discussed their process as writer/writer-editor, and editor. The respect they had for each other was evident throughout the discussion as they listened carefully to one another, built upon each other’s responses, and focused on each other’s strengths and abilities to bring the best of the writer’s words to the page. (more…)

Joining Editors Canada forged my path!

by Ann Kennedy

I joined Editors Canada as a student affiliate looking for opportunities to network with “real live” editors. I was partway through the Editing Certificate program at George Brown College and already thinking past graduation. Three years on, I don’t remember my exact Google search term, but I was thrilled to discover that the 2015 Editors Canada conference—their first international one, no less—was taking place in Toronto. I’m an old hand at conference planning, having worked at the local NXNE Music Festival and Conference for nine years, so I jumped at the chance.

I had no qualms about joining the organization in order to volunteer with it. I recognized the enormous potential for meeting people who could definitely advise me in my new career. And the Editors Canada website promised all manner of other benefits to members, too.

I’m so glad I did.

Volunteering at the registration desk was the ideal way to learn who was who in the editing world. I quickly found out that editors are an extraordinarily friendly and supportive group. My Facebook friend list doubled after the conference!

I went on to volunteer at the Editors Toronto booth at Word On The Street and join a national committee. The student relations committee represents the interests of students and fledgling editors in the association. Our mandate is to raise awareness of the association in editing and journalism programs and grow Editors Canada membership through attracting new student affiliates.

I was also honoured to be asked to join a task force whose goal is to improve access to member services for people who live in remote areas or who cannot access Editors Canada services for other reasons, such as disability.

All of this activity has paid off! I’ve made some great friends and I’ve done two copy editing contracts that were referred to me by members I’d met through volunteering. I highly recommend both joining Editors Canada and volunteering. The more you give of your time and talents, the more you’ll get!

Ann Kennedy is dedicated to reviving the skills and importance of excellent spelling, grammar, punctuation, and syntax in the digital age. She specializes in biography and memoir, travel literature and plain language.

This article was copy edited by Ambrose Li .

 

Webinar: Starting a freelance editing or writing career

Being a freelancer is much more than working in your pyjamas. For the privilege of setting your own hours, you also have to be your own boss, the sales team, the office manager, the bookkeeper, as well as the employee. Learn how in this seminar, which outlines the basic steps to your dream job.

Part 1: Getting Ready
Part 2: Getting Going

As a result of attending this session, attendees will be able to start their own freelance business. They’ll know how to register for a business name and HST number, how to start marketing their services and what to track for basic bookkeeping and taxes.

This webinar series is geared towards communication professionals at all stages of their career.

Presenter: Christine LeBlanc
Date: Saturdays, May 5 and 12
Time: 12 p.m., EDT / 9 a.m., PDT
Length: Two 1 hour sessions
Language: English
Level: Introductory
Member price: $84
Non-member price: $120
Register HERE

Christine LeBlanc started Dossier Communications in 2005, after a decade in publishing. She has a degree in journalism and a professional certification in marketing.

Twitter: @DossierCom

Book Review: Side Hustle by Chris Guillebeau

Side Hustle

(Crown, 2017)

By Jessica Trudel

Do you find your day job fulfilling? If you answered “no,” Side Hustle is for you. If you answered “yes,” Side Hustle is also for you.

That’s what author Chris Guillebeau gets across in the early pages of Side Hustle: From Idea to Income in 27 Days. “Everyone should have a side hustle. Even if you love your job, having more than one source of income will give you more freedom and more options.”

Who doesn’t want the freedom that more money can bring? And if you could start bringing in more money in less than a month, even better.

Side Hustle outlines Guillebeau’s five-week program to launch a successful side hustle. Besides being a veteran side hustler himself, Guillebeau is also the bestselling author of The $100 Startup.

In his book, Guillebeau targets those people who want to want to make money as entrepreneurs but who aren’t prepared to fully commit to self-employment. Perhaps they like their day job and want to keep it, or perhaps they just aren’t ready to quit yet.

Side Hustle is an easy read. Guillebeau uses accessible language, not jargon, to emphasize that you don’t need an MBA to run a successful side hustle. He includes anecdotes in every chapter, telling stories of regular people who came up with an idea for a side hustle and took immediate action. None of his subjects sat down and wrote out a detailed business plan first.

Still, there isn’t much to learn in Side Hustle if you already have entrepreneurial experience. In fact, some of it may seem downright obvious. Regardless, it’s a good reminder that keeping things simple is often the fastest route to success.

Guillebeau’s writing style is entertaining and inventive. He cleverly transitions between ideas and anecdotes. For example, after sharing an anecdote about one person’s sweater-selling side hustle, Guillebeau writes, “Like sweaters, side hustles are not one size fits all.” He also commits to his metaphors, dedicating seven pages to “the recipe for hustling success” and wrapping it up with, “A recipe is only as good as the finished product you take out of the oven.”

I was impressed with the formatting and organization of the book. It expands on the typical table of contents by including a summary of the 27-day plan with short one-to-two-sentence teasers. These teasers reappear at the beginning of the corresponding chapter, to reinforce the importance of sticking to the plan.

Guillebeau admits that he’s a bit indecisive. “If you’re like me, you may sometimes have trouble choosing among all your different side hustle ideas,” he writes. It feels as though Guillebeau couldn’t decide if he wanted Side Hustle to be a workbook or a textbook. Side Hustle includes a few workbook features: he leaves some room to make notes or answer questions in five places within the book. Since Guillebeau touts that most of the planning in his system can be done “on the back of a napkin,” it seems that he could have made room for planning in every chapter. It would have also been okay for him to leave no room for planning at all. Just make a decision, Chris!

Many editors with day jobs think they have a successful side hustle, but Guillebeau wants readers to understand that a truly successful side hustle brings in “passive income.” Editing is labour-intensive; typically an editor is only paid per hour or per word. Passive income is earned if, for example, you write a book about editing that continues to sell without your ever having to write another word. Guillebeau would encourage a side-hustling editor to find a way to make their hustle more self-sufficient.

Ultimately, Guillebeau’s message is this: “A good side hustle…can help support your life, but it doesn’t have to be your whole life.” I think all of us who dedicate almost every waking minute to writing and editing can all take a little wisdom from that.

Jessica Trudel has been a freelance writer and editor since 2006 and is an outspoken advocate for the arts in Northern Ontario. A mother of four girls, she is also on the board of directors of her local writers’ guild. She recently began hosting LitBulbs on YouTube.

This article was copy edited by Ellen Fleischer.

Book Review: Boss Bitch by Nicole Lapin

Boss Bitch

(Crown, 2017)

By Alethea Spiridon

 

Nicole Lapin knows what she’s talking about. She’s a wildly successful career woman who has blazed a path for herself as both a businesswoman (launching the CASH Smartwatch) and as a news anchor for CNN and CNBC. A boss bitch is the “she-ro” of her own story, Lapin writes on page 1 of the book: “She is the heroine who doesn’t need saving because she has her own shit handled. I became a Boss Bitch by embracing being a ‘boss’ in all aspects of the word.”

 

That opening sets the tone and pace for this marvellous book that will no doubt empower women who need a nudge, or even an all-out kick in the butt, to take their career—and life—to the next level, and to be as successful as wanted and needed. Lapin’s tone is forthright and honest, and girlfriend to girlfriend, something she says at the outset is exactly how she intends it to be.

 

Her voice and approach make the content relatable and easy to digest; it’s like going for drinks with a great friend who has your back, but calls you out on your nonsense because all she wants is the best for you. Lapin has plenty of insights to share that can really help women get back on track or consider what track to finally take to become the Boss Bitch in their own lives.

 

Though the book promises a “12-Step Plan to Take Charge of Your Career” it really isn’t a 12-step approach because not all steps will apply to all women. The steps are divided into three sections: Being the Boss of You, Being the Boss at Work, and Being the Boss of Your Own Business. This is the book’s only failing. Although many women will fall into one of these categories, it seemed as though there would be a 12-step outline you should follow to become a Boss Bitch. But no. This is a little misleading, but not enough to condemn the book as a whole. Boss Bitch contains hidden gems of advice given throughout and offers much valuable insight and advice for every woman at whatever stage of her career she is in.

 

One of the book’s best aspects is what Lapin calls the “Bottom Line”, offered at the end of each chapter, tackling a piece of conventional wisdom, then giving it her spin on the “Real Deal.” The real deal is her no sugar-coating take on the situation presented, and she shows how the conventional wisdom of the topic at hand may or may not be accurate. For example, one piece of conventional wisdom is that assertive women are overbearing. Her first response to this, her Real Deal reply? “Hell no.” These insights alone, as well as the Bitch Tips and Confessions of a Boss Bitch sprinkled throughout each chapter, are worth the price of the book alone.

 

She holds nothing back, from revealing her salary level along the course of her career, to personal anecdotes of failure, to how she got back up and learned from those experiences. Her strength of character and steadfastness in her desire to succeed is utterly infectious and is sure to inspire the women who take the time to invest in themselves by reading her book. Boss Bitch is a manifesto of sorts on how to achieve your best self and best life without compromising your values, ethics, and true desires.

Alethea Spiridon is a writer and editor in Southern Ontario. Her first book, Kissing Strangers: How to Online Date Like a Boss is out now and available on Amazon. [www.freelanceeditor.ca]

This article was copy edited by Nicole North.

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